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Adolescent Health Workshop Part 2: 2012

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Adolescent Health Workshop
Part 2:
Working with youth.
Skills, interventions and the HEADSS
Assessment tool
References.
• As for Lecture One.
Lecture 2. Objectives:
1. Describe the general skills all health
professionals need to work effectively with
youth.
2. Discuss effective communication skills all
health professionals need to work effectively
with youth.
3. Outline effective youth centered interventions.
4. Describe the HEADSS Assessment Tool.
5. Outline key questions to assess youth health
needs based on the HEADSS Assessment tool
Obj. 1.Outline Qualities of Key Qualities of successful
youth health programmes. (repeat from Lec 1.
To set the scene)
Programmes that are:
•
non-traditional
•
focus on improved social outcomes
•
involve family and consider the social
contexts
•
are coherent and easy to use
•
this requires professionals to redefine
roles and to be youth friendly.
WHO (2012).
Making health servicesadolescent friendly
It is interesting to note, however, that
different groups of adolescents, from various
parts of the world, identify two key, common
characteristics.
• They want to be treated with respect and
to be sure that their
• confidentiality is protected (p.5).
• national quality
standards for adolescent friendly
Obj. 2. General Skills to work effectively with youth.
Health professionals build trusting relationships:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
.
Be Friendly, confident welcoming.
Attend to their social or cultural needs
Clear introductions; yourself, your role.
What you’ll be doing and why.
Clear boundaries; explain that you do see young people
alone and with family and why .
Outline confidentiality before the interview.
Objective 3. Communication Skills
These include Ten Specific considerations
The most important communication skill is
your attitude:
1. Provide a friendly, respectful, open attitude
2. Ensure privacy
3. Use language that is understood
4. Utilise your listening skills
5. Begin with open ended questions
6. Offer explanation for questions
Continued
• 7. Move from less sensitive to more sensitive
topics.
• 8. Move from third person approach to the
personal.
• 9. Be aware of needs related issues: culture,
developmental stage, gender, sexual
orientation, religious values.
• 10. Be keen to get to know this young person
who is with you at this moment.
Objective 4. Outline 8 effective
youth centred interventions.
1. Communicate effectively (see earlier slides).
2. Assess well, cover the presenting problem and
use the HEADSSss framework.
3. Develop an overview of the young persons
well being.
4. Consider the problems and the strengths
together.
Consider the options together.
continued
5. Make a plan together that addresses the
issues .
6. Consider the factors that will assist or make it
difficult for the young person to implement
the plan.
7. Examine how to deal with these issues.
8. Make a plan for ongoing support.
Obj. 5 Describe the HEADSS
Assessment.
What is HEADSS?
• It is a DEVELOPMENTAL APPROPRIATE SCREENING
TOOL the provides:
• An opportunity to develop rapport
• Assists the professional to cover their strong areas as
well as gaps
• It provides a ‘psychosocial biopsy’- an overall
impression of resiliency (risk and protective factors)
• Ensures intervention and follow-up.
HEADSS: Adolescent Risk Profile
Assessment
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
HHome
EEducation and occupation
AActivities (outside school)
DDrugs and alcohol(licit and illicit)
SSexuality
SSuicide and mood.
Are being developed further.
Asking the Questions.
• It is vital that you ask sensitive well structured
questions.
• The following slides outline the areas you
want to cover in the interview.
• Important to phrase the questions carefully.
• Use these examples as a guide. Find your own
voice.
Obj. 6. Outline key questions to assess
youth health needs.
H Home:
 Where do you live and who lives with
you?
What’s good about home?
What’s not so good?
Ask about extended family: iwi, hapu.
Jobs or responsibilities at home?
Who makes the rules?
What happens if they are broken?
Education and Employment
E
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
=
Educational/Employment
Are you at school/in training or work?
If no. How long been out of school/work?
Plans?
What do you do with your time now?
What do you like about school?
How are you doing in school?
Do you have any ideas what you want to do when
you leave school?
Activities
• What do you do afters schoolwork? In the weekends?
(chores, Homework, TV, sport? See friends? Going out at
night?)
• How do you get around? Do you drive? Do you drive drunk
sometimes?
• Friends drive? Have you been in a car when the driver was
drunk?
• Do you wear a safety belt?
• Do you go to parties?
• What do you do for fun?
• For a buzz?
• Do you ever diet?
• What about sleeping? Do you sleep well?
Drugs and Alcohol
• Use by peers? Use by client? (include alcohol
and smoking).
• Use by family members?
• Amounts, frequency, patterns of use/abuse and
car use while intoxicated?
• Source-how paid for?
Sexuality
 Orientation?
 Degree and types of sexual experience and acts?
 Number of partners?
 History of pregnancy/abortion?
 Sexually transmitted diseases-knowledge and
prevention?
 Contraception? Frequency of use?
 Comfort with sexual activity, enjoyment/pleasure
obtained?
 History of sexual/physical abuse?
Last step:
S= Suicide risk.
Everybody has good days and bad days.
What is your mood like? Do you ever
have really good days? Really bad
days?
Do you ever feel like you want to end it
all?
Do you have a plan to hurt/kill your
self?
How do you plan to?
HEADSSss: DO ASK!
• If you don’t ask they won’t tell (Bob Blum)
• If you do ask, in the right way at the right
time, they usually do tell
• Do ask, even if you think you know the
answer
• If you are not convinced, try it out
SUMMARY.
The key points of effective interventions.
•
A positive relationship
•
Thorough assessment
•
Inclusive of family and young person
•
Plans made with the young person and family
•
Follow up
Caring for someone who is suicidal.
Check this out
• http://www.spinz.org.nz/page/152-caring-forsomeone-suicidal
You Can Make a Difference
Youth Health: You can make a
difference:
1. You don’t have to know everything
2. Do be friendly
3. Do spend time with teens
4. Do screen for significant health issues
5. Do have a routine approach to asking
You can make a difference cont.
6. Do tackle multiple domains, make it real, be
practical, concrete and involved
7. Do build on strengths and address
problems
8. Do expect inconsistencies
9. Do follow up
Good Resource to develop further
questions.
• See Appendix G. p. 439 In:
• McMurray, A. & Clendon, J. (2010).
Community Health and Wellness 4e Primary
Health Care in Practice. Sydney. Elsevier
Australia
What do I need to Know?
• Lecture One:
• All Objectives 1-4 (not recent Developments in
Youth health Nursing, this is for interest only).
• Lecture 2:
• All objectives 1-6.
•
•
For Interest Only, check out this story of how one man has helped many people
considering suicide. Ted Talk: The Bridge between suicide and life
http://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_briggs_the_bridge_between_suicide_and_life?ut
m_source=newsletter_weekly_2014-0516&utm_campaign=newsletter_weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_content=talk_
of_the_week_image
For Interest Only, check out this story of how one man has helped many
people considering suicide. Ted Talk: The Bridge between suicide and life
•
http://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_briggs_the_bridge_between_suicide_and_life?ut
m_source=newsletter_weekly_2014-0516&utm_campaign=newsletter_weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_content=talk_
of_the_week_image
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