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Brazilians in MA

IntégréTéléchargement
A Profile of Brazilian Remitters
in Massachusetts
July 2007
Alvaro Lima & Pete Plastrik
INTRODUCTION
2
3

This research was done by the Transnational
Community Development Network - TransComm
- in partnership with the Innovation Network for
Communities – INC;

INC is a national non-profit organization focused
on supporting civic entrepreneurs to develop
and spread scalable innovations that transform
the performance of community systems;

TransComm’s mission is to help immigrant
communities in the U.S. to develop their
economic, political and social-cultural
transnational capitals.
4

This research was funded by a grant from the
Kellogg Foundation and completed during the
period May-July 2007;

The research traces the demographic profile, the
pattern of use of remittances and the presence
of transnational behavior among Brazilians
residing in MA and sending money to their
country;
METHODOLOGY
5
6

According to the Census PUMS 2000, the total number
of Brazilian-born adult (25+) immigrants in
Massachusetts is 24,056, representing 15.9% of the total
of Brazilians in the U.S., second only to Florida (21.1%);

A sample of 250 subjects (1/1000) is representative of
the population with a confidence interval of 6.17% at a
confidence level of 95%. Inferences drawn from survey
questions specifically directed to remitters should be
limited to Brazilian remitters in MA;

However, according to the American Development
Bank – MIF, the percentage of immigrants who send
money from MA is 70% so that the inference based on
remitters cover a large part of all adult Brazilians;
7

The routes for the field work were designed around
remittance agencies that send money to Brazil in
the cities and areas with the greater Brazilian
population;

The subjects were selected randomly and intercepted
at remittance agencies, to ensure that they were active
senders;

A staff of 5 Portuguese speaking interviewers was
provided by TransComm and trained in administering
the surveys by Silvestre HMR&S who also tabulated the
results;
8

Unless otherwise indicated, all results are statistically
significant at a probability level of .0001;

The survey included some questions from the 2003 and
2006 surveys directed by Manuel Orozco of the InterAmerican Dialogue in order to compare Brazilians with
immigrant from other nationalities.
2006 Survey – Comparison Sample
City
Nationality
NY-NJ
Mexico
100
Dominican Rep.
300
Jamaica
200
El Salvador
100
Guatemala
Los Angeles Chicago DC-Alexandria Miami-F. Lauderdale
300
200
600
300
100
100
200
100
200
Nicaragua
9
700
500
300
400
100
Bolivia
Total
Total
200
400
200
100
100
200
2000
2003 Survey – Comparison Sample
Nationality
Colombia
Cuba
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Guyana
Honduras
México
Nicaragua
Dominican Republic
Total
10
New York
100
100
City
Los Angeles
Miami
100
175
110
109
236
75
100
182
150
150
686
401
500
Total
100
175
100
210
109
236
75
282
150
150
1587
DEMOGRAPHICS
OF BRAZILIAN
REMITTERS
11

The age of Brazilian remitters (35.63) is close to the
average (34.38) but statistically higher:
Average Age by Nationality
45.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00
5.00
0.00
12
AVERAGE = 34.38
41.14
36.85
35.96
35.63
35.19
34.36
33.45
31.56

Brazilians are the second nationality in the proportion
of male remitters (66.4%) while this proportion is
reversed for Salvadoran 63.8% female:
Gender by Country of Origin
70.0
66.4%
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
13
Male
Female

Although the general level of education among
Brazilians is high school, they rank third in College
degrees:
Education by Nationality
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Nicaragua
Jamaica
College degree
14
Brazil
Dominican Rep.
Some college
High School
Bolivia
Mexico
El Salvador
Elementary
Not elementary
Guatemala

While the typical education level for Brazilian males is
high school (36.75%), one out of four females
(23.81%) has a college degree:
Education by Gender
40.00%
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
Male
Female
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
College
degree
15
Some College High School
Elementary
School
Did not finish
Elementary

Brazilian remitters have the greater proportion of higher
incomes (32.4%) and the lower proportion of lesser income
(1.6%). One out of three Brazilians has higher income than
other L.A. and Caribbean immigrants:
Income by Nationality
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
Brazil
16
Less than 10,000
Bolivia
10,000 to 15,000
Nicaragua
15,001 to 20,000
Jamaica
Guatemala
20,001 to 25,000
Dominican Rep.
25,001 to 30,000
Mexico
30,001 to 35,000
El Salvador
Over 35,000

One out of every three Brazilians in MA, regardless of
their educational level, has an income of over
$35,000; except those with some college education,
whose majority earns between $20K to $25K:
Income by Education
40.00%
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
College degree
17
Less than $10,000
$30,001 to $35,000
Some college
$10,000 to $15,000
More than $35,000
High School
$15,001 to $20,000
Elementary School
$20,001 to $25,000
Did not finish
Elementary
$25,001 to $30,000

Compared to other L.A. and Caribbean immigrant
communities, Brazilians have the lowest proportion of
U.S. citizenship (3.2%):
U.S. Citizenship by Nationality
60.00%
56%
50.00%
43%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
17.3%
16%
14%
12.8%
12%
10.00%
3.2%
0.00%
18

Most Brazilians who are U.S. citizens have lived in the
country over fifteen years (1.21%) or between six to
eight years (0.81%):
Years in US / Citizenship
Less than a year
Yes
Total
4.03%
4.03%
Between one and three years
40.73%
40.73%
Between four and five years
23.79%
0.40%
24.19%
Six to eight years
20.56%
0.81%
21.37%
Nine to ten years
1.21%
0.40%
1.61%
Eleven to fifteen years
3.23%
0.40%
3.63%
Over fifteen years
2.42%
1.21%
3.63%
NR
0.81%
Total
Largest
19
No
96.77%
2nd Largest
3rd Largest
0.81%
3.23%
100.00%

The majority of Brazilians who are U.S. citizen (37.5%)
have been living in the U.S. for over 15 years. One out
of four (25%) have been living in the U.S. from 6 to 8
years:
Citizenship by years in US
37.5%
40.00
35.00
30.00
25%
25.00
20.00
15.00
12.5%
12.5%
12.5%
10.00
5.00
0.00
Between four
and five years
20
Six to eight
years
Nine to ten
years
Eleven to fifteen Over fifteen
years
years

Years in US
Less than 1
Brazil
Honduras
Colombia
Cuba
Nicaragua
Guatemala
Mexico
El Salvador
Guyana
Ecuador
Dom. Republic
4.0%
6.7%
8.0%
4.0%
4.0%
8.3%
6.7%
0.5%
0.8%
3.0%
2.0%
1 to 3
40.4%
37.3%
32.0%
27.4%
26.7%
24.8%
21.6%
16.2%
13.1%
12.0%
4.7%
4 to 5
24.0%
17.3%
31.0%
22.9%
31.3%
24.8%
23.4%
28.1%
14.8%
20.0%
13.3%
6 to 8
21.2%
18.7%
15.0%
17.7%
12.7%
20.2%
14.2%
17.6%
30.9%
31.0%
18.0%
9 to 10
1.6%
9.3%
7.0%
16.0%
10.7%
4.6%
14.5%
11.9%
14.4%
28.0%
26.7%
11 to 15
3.6%
4.0%
3.0%
3.4%
4.7%
1.8%
7.1%
8.6%
8.1%
4.0%
14.7%
Over 15
3.6%
6.7%
4.0%
8.0%
10.0%
12.8%
12.4%
15.2%
11.0%
2.0%
20.0%
Largest
21
As most immigrants, the majority of Brazilian
immigrants (85.6%) has been living in the U.S.
between 1 and 8 years:
2nd Largest
3rd Largest

The majority of Brazilians (85.6%) are employed.
12.4% of them own a business:
Employment
90.0%
80.0%
70.0%
60.0%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0.0%
22

College education is found only among business owners
(50%), students and housewives. These different
education levels do not affect incomes which is over
$35k for almost all levels:
5
Education
4
3
2
1
Employed
Student
23
Unemployed
Freelance worker
Business owner
Housewife
Occupation

24
The typical Brazilian household is composed of 3 to 4
people mostly (82%) adults over 21 :

Almost half (44.4%) of Brazilian remitters have been
in the U.S. less than 3 years. The other half (45.2%)
have lived in the country between 4 to 8 years:
Years in the U.S.
45
40.4%
40
35
30
24%
25
21.2%
20
15
10
4%
1.6%
5
3.6%
3.6%
0
25
Less than 1
1-3
4-5
6-8
9 - 10
11 - 15
Over 15

Most Brazilians are renters (88%), with only 10.8% of
owning houses. The median income for homeowners
(over $35,000) is higher than that of renters ($31,000
to $35,000):
House Ownership by Income
70.00%
60.00%
50.00%
40.00%
Own house
Rent
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
26
Less than 10,000 to 15,001 to 20,001 to 25,001 to 30,001 to
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
Over
35,000
FINANCIAL
BEHAVIOR OF
BRAZILIAN
REMITTERS
27

Almost every other nationality, 50% of Brazilians send
money home once a month. 33.2% remit twice a
month, and 9.2% once every three months:
Frequency of remittances by nationality
80.0
70.0
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Nicaragua
28
Guatemala
Once a month
Mexico
Twice a month
Bolivia
Once every three months
Brazil
Dominican
Republic
Once every six months
Jamaica
Once a year
El Salvador
Other

Cities from Minas Gerais are the most important receiving
cities in Brazil:
Beneficiary Cities
8
7.6%
7.2%
7
6%
6
5.6%
5.2%
4.8%
5
4
3
2
1
0
29
3.6%
3.2%
2.8% 2.8%
2.4%

Minas Gerais, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo are
Brazil’s top receiving states:
Beneficiary States
60
51.6%
50
40
30
20
9.6%
10
0
30
6.4%
6%
5.2%
4.4%
3.6%
3.6%
2.4%

31
Although the mean of the most recent transaction is
$747, the mode is $500 with a distribution tilted to
the left:

Even correcting for outliers, monthly remittances for
Brazilians ($875) are much higher than the average
for other L.A. communities:
Monthly Remittance by Nationality
$900
$875
$800
$700
$600
$500
$400
$300
$200
ABOVE AVERAGE
$398
AVERAGE = $294
$331
$278
$274
$218
BELOW AVERAGE
$192
$188 $185 $177
$100
$-
32
OBS: Monthly amounts are high even when corrected for gender, education, annual income and years in the U.S..
$113

33
Although the average fee for remittances is $9.28, the
distribution is tilted to the left with a median around
$10:

Compared to the 2006 sample, Brazilians display a
very different behavior with regard to preferred
agency. Braz Transfers is their first choice, with
Western Union in second and Chang Express in third:
Preferred Agency
BRAZIL
Braz Transfers
33.20%
Western Union
20.08%
Chang Express
13.60%
Uno Transfer
13.20%
Money Gram
6.80%
Global
3.60%
MEXICO
Mexico Express
DOMINICAN R.
JAMAICA
EL SALVADOR
GUATEMALA
23.33%
45.50%
18.75%
30.00%
14.50%
15.00%
3.00%
12.33%
36.00%
21.25%
3.00%
1.00%
2.00%
21.50%
7.00%
19.00%
Pronto Envíos
3.50%
18.00%
Ria Envía
3.50%
3.00%
0.50%
0.50%
5.00%
13.00%
11.00%
La Nacional
2.00%
8.00%
36.50%
Dolex
34
NICARAGUA
33.67%
Banco Agrícola
Largest
BOLIVIA
6.67%
2nd Largest
3rd Largest
2.33%
1.00%
3.00%
8.00%

The majority of Brazilians are very satisfied (41.6%) or
satisfied (51.2%) with their remittance agencies:
Level of Satisfaction with Company
35

Compared to the 2003 sample, the majority of
Brazilians (75%), as every other L.A. and Caribbean
immigrants, do not use services other than
remittances. 11.6% of them use money orders while
3.6% use check cashing:
Other services
Money order
Brazil
Guyana Ecuador Nicaragua
Cuba
Colombia
11.6%
Dominican R.
1.3%
Guatemala
Honduras
17.1%
México
El Salvador
9.8%
5.5%
Check cashing
3.6%
0.7%
Bill payment
1.2%
Buy airplane tickets
0.4%
Buy different things
0.4%
Payday loan
0.4%
Checking account
0.4%
Other
7.0%
68.1%
51.3%
42.6%
39.6%
37.6%
32.3%
16.2%
30.0%
15.8%
6.9%
None
75%
31.9%
48.7%
57.4%
60.4%
62.4%
66.5%
66.7%
70.0%
73.7%
87.6%
OBS: Other services and products made use by the other L.A. and Caribbean communities include phone cards, phone booths
and cargo services.
Largest
36
2nd Largest
3rd Largest

While Brazilians choose an agency based on of the
accessibility or convenience of service, other L.A. and
Caribbean immigrants look for quality of service and
company reputation:
Reasons to prefer agency
Close/Convenient/More agencies
Costumer service/Friendly staff/Language
Accessible/Easy to use/Services/Schedules
Prestige/Well know/Recommended
Price/Exchange rate/Free/Discounts
Responsible/Secure/Trustworthy
Fast/Punctual/Efficient/No problems
OBS: 2003 sample comparison.
1st Choice
37
2nd Choice
3rd Choice
Brazil
México Dominican R. Jamaica El Salvador Guatemala
27.3% 30.8%
16.0%
7.5%
12.8%
34.0%
22.2%
0.8%
8.3%
13.5%
14.0%
5.0%
20.1% 14.8%
5.0%
11.0%
8.3%
11.0%
16.1%
8.5%
2.0%
2.5%
3.8%
4.0%
14.0% 10.2%
13.7%
16.0%
9.3%
27.0%
30.2%
32.3%
23.5%
53.3%
32.0%
25.7%
28.0%
28.5%
20.3%
19.0%

Consistently, the majority (63.6%) of the agencies
preferred by Brazilians are at walking distance from
home, although one out of three (32%) are at a less
than 30 minutes drive:
Distance of Transfer Company from Home
70.0%
63.6%
60.0%
50.0%
40.0%
32.0%
30.0%
20.0%
4.0%
10.0%
0.4%
0.0%
Walking distance
38
Less than 30
minutes drive
Between 30 and 60
minutes
Don't know

Mother/father are the main beneficiaries of
remittances for every country, except Guyana. Second
place beneficiaries for Brazilians are husband/wife.
For Brazilians, as for Nicaraguans, Cubans and
Dominicans, children come in third:
Brazil Guatemala
Beneficiary
Mother/Father
Husband/Wife
Your Children
Your Siblings
Other relatives
Friends
Business Partner
Other
36.3%
21.4%
19.3%
14.6%
3.9%
2.1%
2.1%
0.3%
Grandparents
49.5% 48.2%
22.9% 24.5%
5.5% 8.2%
14.7% 13.1%
6.4% 3.9%
0.9%
OBS: 2003 sample comparison.
Largest
39
2nd Largest
México Colombia Nicaragua Ecuador El Salvador Cuba
3rd Largest
2.1%
46.0%
14.0%
20.0%
9.0%
3.0%
43.3%
15.3%
15.3%
18.7%
2.7%
39.0%
9.0%
36.0%
14.0%
1.0%
8.0%
4.7%
1.0%
36.7%
24.8%
11.9%
14.8%
5.7%
0.5%
Dominican R. Honduras Guyana
36.6%
7.4%
16.0%
24.6%
8.0%
36.0%
13.3%
14.7%
19.3%
8.7%
2.7%
5.2% 7.4%
5.3%
30.7% 11.4%
26.7%
8.5%
13.3% 16.9%
18.7%
6.8%
4.0% 18.2%
1.3%
1.3%
5.3%
1.3%

Like in many other L.A. communities, Food (24.6%)
and Clothing (17.3%) are the main articles bought
with remittances in Brazil. Medical expenses come in
third place for Brazilians while housing is the third
choice for every other communities:
Nationality
Uses
Brazil
Nicaragua Cuba Guatemala El Salvador Colombia Honduras Ecuador México Dominican R.Guyana
Food
24.60%
96.7% 96.6%
89.9%
89.5%
89.0%
88.0%
87.0%
86.9%
81.3%
72.0%
Clothing
17.30%
68.7% 44.6%
69.7%
55.7%
59.0%
56.0%
29.0%
49.3%
25.3%
61.9%
Medical
16.90%
10.7%
3.4%
3.7%
3.3%
8.0%
1.3%
4.0%
2.8%
6.7%
Housing
15.90%
34.0% 16.6%
56.0%
46.2%
29.0%
32.0%
11.0%
37.2%
32.7%
33.1%
Education
11.60%
29.3% 11.4%
39.4%
36.7%
31.0%
28.0%
20.0%
36.9%
21.3%
26.7%
6.0%
2.7%
8.0%
12.4%
8.0%
16.1%
4.0%
1.0%
3.5%
4.0%
8.5%
0.7%
1.3%
5.0%
8.7%
Don't Know
7.30%
2.7%
3.4%
11.0%
8.1%
Business
5.30%
2.7%
0.6%
1.8%
2.4%
Savings
2.00%
Other
8.00%
0.6%
0.7%
OBS: 2003 sample comparison.
Largest
40
2nd Largest
3rd Largest
1.1%
1.0%
2.8%
4.8%
3.0%
8.0%
8.5%

Years sending money to Brazil, has a perfect
correlation with years living in the U.S., that is, the
longer Brazilians live in the U.S. the longer they send
money to Brazil. The same general tendency holds
true for all other groups included in the 2003 sample:
Percentage of the total
Years in US
<1
1-3
4-5
6-8
9 - 10
11 - 15
>15
NR
Grand Total
41
Years sending money
<1
1 - 3 4 - 5 >5
NR Grand Total
4.0%
4.0%
2.4% 37.9%
0.4%
40.7%
3.2% 20.6% 0.4%
24.2%
2.0% 4.4% 14.9%
21.4%
0.4% 0.4%
0.8%
1.6%
0.4% 0.8% 0.4% 2.0%
3.6%
3.6%
3.6%
0.4% 0.4%
0.8%
7.3% 44.4% 25.8% 22.2% 0.4%
100.0%

Unlike every other L.A. and Caribbean immigrants,
92.4% of Brazilians prefer sending money by making a
deposit into the beneficiary’s bank account. Only 6%
prefers sending cash:
Preferred Method of Transfer Funds
42

Brazilians, along with Salvadorans and Nicaraguans, have
an average number of people (70.4%) with bank accounts
in the U.S.. Mexicans and Guatemalans have below
average numbers while Jamaicans, Bolivians and
Dominicans have above average:
Bank Account in the U.S.by Nationality
90.0
80.0
Above Average
84.5
75.5
75.0
70.4
Average = 61.1%
70.0
58.3
60.0
53.0
Below Average
50.0
39.5
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
43
33.0

Statistical analysis shows that Education (p < .002) and
Years in the U.S. (p < .004) are the most important factors
in determining bank account ownership for Brazilians
residing in the U.S.:
Coefficients*
Non Standardized Coefficients
Model
1
B
Std. Error
(Constant)
.849
.177
Gender
-.073
.068
Education
-.079
Annual personal
income range
How long have you
lived in the United
States?
t
Beta
Sig.
4.788
.000
-.076
-1.085
.279
.025
-.223
-3.171
.002
.001
.019
.002
.030
.976
.071
.024
.206
2.932
.004
*Dependent Variable = Do you have a bank account in the United States?
44
Standardized
Coefficients

Bank of America is the first bank choice (44.8%) for
Brazilians as for many other L.A. and Caribbean
immigrants. Nevertheless, the second and third choices for
Brazilians, Citizens Bank (17.6%) and Sovereign Bank
(4.4%), are not mentioned by any other nationality:
Nationality
Bank in US
BRAZIL
Bank of America
44.80%
Citizens Bank
17.60%
MEXICO
Dominican R.
JAMAICA
EL SALVADOR
GUATEMALA
BOLIVIA
8.50%
10.67%
9.50%
12.00%
8.00%
5.50%
12.67%
18.00%
4.25%
3.00%
3.00%
Chase
8.50%
18.00%
20.00%
3.75%
Washington Mutual
4.17%
7.67%
10.00%
3.75%
13.00%
20.00%
Sovereign Bank
4.40%
Middlesex Bank
1.60%
Citibank
0.40%
Luso American Credit Union
0.40%
1st Choice
45
2nd Choice
3rd Choice
26.50%
NICARAGUA
13.00%

As for almost all other L.A. and Caribbean immigrants, the
main reason for Brazilians not to have a bank account is
the lack of identification papers (40.7%), which is related
to Accessibility and Convenience. The second reason (36%)
is subjective – “I don’t need a bank account.” But the third
reason is also associated with Accessibility: “The process is
very complicated:”
Why not bank
Brazil
México
Dominican R. Jamaica
Colombia El Salvador
Guatemala
I don't have identification papers
40.70%
34.50%
4.00%
2.00%
26.00%
30.75%
41.00%
I don't need a bank account
36.00%
21.17%
12.00%
10.50%
24.00%
12.50%
27.00%
The process is very complicated
11.60%
9.17%
4.33%
1.00%
8.00%
9.50%
8.00%
2.75%
6.00%
I don't speak English
8.10%
I don't trust banks
2.30%
5.83%
6.33%
There is no bank near
1.20%
0.67%
0.33%
1st Reason
46
2nd Reason
3rd Reason
2.00%
2.50%
1.00%
1.00%

When arranged by nationality according to both credit
and debit card ownership, Brazilians stand in the middle
with one third of them (35.6%) holding a debit card and
another third (30.8%) holding neither of them:
Credit/Debit Card by Nationality
70.00%
60.00%
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
47
Both
Credit
Debit
None of them

As with the monthly remittances, Brazilians make above
average monthly payments to credit cards ($744.74).
Nicaraguans, Mexicans and Salvadorans are between the
limits of the average ($325.43):
Monthly Payments to Credit Card by Nationality
$800.00
$714.74
$700.00
$600.00
$500.00
$400.00
$300.00
$200.00
$100.00
$0.00
48
$413.21
$341.00
$317.65 $301.51
$265.45
$217.76 $212.52

The majority of Brazilians (86.6%), as with other L.A. and
Caribbean immigrants, do not have economic obligations
in the U.S.. Only 6.3% of them have home loans payments
and only 3.9% have other loan payments:
Obligations in US
Brazil
Does not have
86.60%
40.3%
75.4%
82.0%
84.7%
89.3%
96.0%
95.2%
88.7%
House payment loans
6.30%
34.3%
18.9%
13.0%
12.0%
6.7%
3.0%
2.4%
2.0%
Loans for other debts
3.90%
26.7%
1.0%
1.3%
Business loans
1.60%
5.5%
2.3%
Education loans
1.60%
10.2%
4.6%
Largest
49
2nd Largest
Guyana
3rd Largest
Cuba
Colombia
Nicaragua
1.0%
Honduras
Ecuador
1.3%
El Salvador Dominican R. Guatemala
1.3%
6.0%
2.7%
México
98.2% 97.5%
1.8%
1.1%
0.7%
2.0%
5.3%
1.0%
1.4%
6.0%
0.7%

Two out of three (66.8%) Brazilians would be interested in
contributing a small portion of their remittances to
support a “development fund” to invest in their own
community:
Percentage of Brazilians Interested in Contributing to a Dev. Fund
50

42.8% of Brazilians would contribute a 1% of the value of
remittance to the fund. One out of five (20%), could
contribute 2% to 5%:
Size of Contribution as a Percentage of Remittance Value
51

When the monthly remittance to Brazil and the portion
donated to the fund are multiplied together, the potential
monthly investment would be $362,471. If instead, we use
the general average of $875 the potential investment
would be $295,918.90. We could also, to be more
conservative, use the mode value of $500 the total would
be $169,082.50:
Potential Monthly Investment in the Dev. Fund
How much money do you send to your home country per month?
Portion to support immigrant fund
% of the total
Brazilians in MA
10 percent or more
2.4%
577
$795.00
$79.50
$45,898.85
6-9 percent
0.8%
192
$325.00
$24.38
$4,690.92
2-5 percent
19.6%
4,715
$1,166.12
$40.81
$192,438.38
1 percent
42.0%
10,104
$1,182.19
$11.82
$119,442.85
Total
64.8%
24,056
$1,152.41
52
Average remittance
% for support
---
Estimated support
$362,471.00

Almost half (42.4%) of the Brazilians surveyed, chose
English classes as their choice for services to be delivered
by the investment fund. 25.6% chose small business
financing while 19.6% and 6.8% preferred scholarships and
child care as their investment priorities respectively:
Services to be Sponsored by Investment Fund
45
42.4
40
35
30
25.6
25
19.6
20
15
10
5
0
53
6.8
2
1.6
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
TRANSNATIONAL
BEHAVIOR OF
BRAZILIAN
REMITTERS
54

72% of Brazilian immigrants have never traveled back
home, along with Cubans, Guatemalans, Hondurans,
Colombians and Nicaraguans. Dominicans on the other
hand travel once or twice a year:
Travel to country
Brazil
Guyana Ecuador Rep. Dom.El Salvador México Nicaragua Colombia Honduras
3 or more times a year
0.40%
5.08%
11.33%
1.43%
2.13%
2.00%
2.00%
Twice a year
2.80% 10.59%
9.00%
24.00%
5.24%
4.26%
6.00%
7.00%
5.33%
Once a year
6.80% 23.31% 29.00%
32.67%
19.05% 17.02% 11.33%
13.00% 6.67%
Once every two years
1.60% 16.10% 26.00%
10.67%
5.24%
3.90% 13.33%
6.00%
12.00%
Once every three years
0.80%
9.32%
3.00%
3.33%
8.10%
5.32%
3.33%
2.67%
Less than 1 every 3 years 1.60% 22.88%
7.00%
16.00%
21.90% 12.41% 12.67%
15.00%
12.00%
I've never travelled
72.00%
32.38% 39.72% 51.33%
57.00%
58.67%
Median frequency
55
Cuba Guatemala
0.92%
2.29%
3.67%
10.86%
4.59%
4.00%
3.67%
1.71%
0.92%
13.14%
15.60%
68.00%
70.64%

As almost every other L.A. and Caribbean immigrant
community, Brazilians who travel, typically stay two to
three weeks (5.6%) or less than two months (5.2%):
Duration of Stay
Brazil
Guyana
Dominican R. Ecuador
El Salvador
Cuba
Nicaragua
Colombia
México Honduras Guatemala
A week or less
0.80%
7.63%
7.33%
1.00%
1.90%
1.71%
6.00%
7.00%
3.55%
5.33%
1.83%
2-3 weeks
5.60%
49.58%
48.67%
42.00%
26.67%
26.29%
26.00%
24.00%
18.79%
18.67%
18.35%
Less than 2 months
5.20%
16.10%
26.00%
20.00%
15.71%
3.43%
12.00%
9.00%
12.06%
13.33%
3.67%
More than 2 months
2.40%
1.69%
8.00%
9.00%
8.10%
3.33%
2.00%
6.38%
4.00%
4.59%
51.33%
57.00%
39.72%
58.67%
70.64%
Not Applicable
1st Duration
56
2nd Duration
72%
3rd Duration
32.38%
68.00%

Brazilians (52%) are among the communities with high
frequency of phone calls home ( two or more times a
week) along with Dominicans and Ecuadoreans. Other L.A.
and Carribean immigrants typically call once a week,
except Guyanese and Cuban immigrants who call once
every two weeks:
Frequency of calls
Dominican R. Ecuador
Brazil Colombia Nicaragua
Mexico El Salvador
Honduras
Guatemala
Guyana
Cuba
2 or more a week
60.7%
55.0%
52.4%
39.0%
28.7%
28.0%
23.8%
22.7%
21.1%
15.3%
11.4%
Once a week
16.7%
43.0%
35.2%
38.0%
40.0%
44.0%
34.3%
33.3%
34.9%
23.3%
34.3%
Once every 2 weeks
11.3%
2.0%
6.4%
16.0%
20.0%
14.2%
27.6%
25.3%
26.6%
28.0%
30.9%
Once a month
8.0%
4.0%
6.0%
8.0%
8.9%
11.4%
10.7%
12.8%
19.1%
16.0%
Less than once a month
3.3%
1.6%
1.0%
2.0%
3.9%
2.9%
6.7%
4.6%
6.4%
3.4%
1.3%
1.1%
8.1%
4.0%
NR
Median frequency
57
0.4%
1.3%

The median call length for Brazilians is 21 to 30 minutes,
along with Dominicans, Colombians, Hondurans and
Nicaraguans. The lengthier calls, more than 30 minutes,
are made by Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Mexicans.
Ecuadorean, Cuban, and Guyanese immigrants typically
call for 11 to 20 minutes:
Length of calls
Guatemala El Salvador
Less than 5 min.
Mexico
Dominican R. Brazil
Colombia
Honduras
Nicaragua
0.5%
2.5%
0.7%
1.2%
2.0%
4.0%
0.7%
Ecuador
Cuba
Guyana
4.6%
3.4%
6 to 10 min.
1.8%
4.3%
3.2%
6.7%
7.2%
10.0%
14.7%
9.3%
4.0%
21.1%
15.3%
11 to 20 min.
9.2%
11.4%
7.8%
13.3%
18.8%
15.0%
20.0%
24.7%
45.0%
39.4%
39.0%
21 to 30 min.
18.3%
22.4%
29.4%
35.3%
28.4%
32.0%
25.3%
36.0%
37.0%
21.1%
22.0%
More than 30 min.
64.2%
59.0%
55.7%
44.0%
44.0%
40.0%
29.3%
26.0%
13.0%
9.7%
7.6%
Median Length
58

All Brazilians buy products made in their country of origin,
as do 95% of Ecuadorians. Salvadorans, Guatemalans and
Cubans show below average purchases:
Purchasing of Nostalgic Products
100.00%
ABOVE AVERAGE
90.00%
80.00%
70.00%
60.00%
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
59
AVERAGE = 72%
BELOW AVERAGE

Almost half of the Brazilians (45.4%) purchase foods and
spices from Brazil. One out of five (20.5%) buy Brazilian
videos, DVDs and CDs with clothing occupying the third
place (17.8%):
Purchasing of Nostalgic Products
50.0%
45.4%
45.0%
40.0%
35.0%
30.0%
25.0%
20.0%
20.5%
17.8%
15.0%
10.0%
5.0%
0.0%
60
5.1%
4.9%
3.7%
1.6%
0.8%
0.2%

Except for Guyanese and Ecuadorian immigrants, all other
L.A. and Caribbean communities do not have financial
obligations in their countries of origin. When they do,
savings accounts and home mortgages are most common.
27.1% of Brazilians hold a savings account and 6.9% have
home mortgages:
Economic activities back home
Does not have
Savings account in a bank
Mortgage loan
Brazil
51.2%
27.1%
6.9%
Family/commercial business
Life and health insurance
Lends money to family
Student loan
Loan to maintain a business
Rent payments
Medical expenses
1st Activity
61
2nd Activity
2.0%
0.4%
9.9%
2.3%
0.1%
0.1%
3rd Activity
Guyana
35.2%
48.3%
18.2%
8.1%
4.7%
8.5%
1.3%
1.7%
México El Salvador Cuba Dominican R. Nicaragua Colombia Ecuador Guatemala Honduras
71.3%
25.2%
4.3%
2.1%
75.7% 92.0%
19.5% 1.7%
5.7% 2.3%
1.4% 1.7%
1.1%
62.7%
29.3%
6.0%
3.3%
0.7%
0.4%
0.4%
0.4%
0.5%
2.3%
2.7%
0.7%
0.7%
84.0%
4.7%
6.0%
2.7%
2.7%
1.3%
0.7%
0.7%
62.0%
22.0%
8.0%
6.0%
9.0%
4.0%
5.0%
1.0%
43.0%
55.0%
14.0%
1.0%
76.1%
19.3%
3.7%
1.8%
1.0%
0.9%
60.0%
16.0%
12.0%
4.0%
8.0%
2.7%
2.7%

One out of three Brazilians (37.6%) does not have financial
accounts in his/her country. 28.9% have checking accounts
while 26% have savings accounts. Only 5.5% have credit
cards:
Financial Accounts in Country of Origin
40.0%
37.6%
35.0%
28.9%
30.0%
26.0%
25.0%
20.0%
15.0%
10.0%
5.5%
1.6%
5.0%
0.3%
0.0%
Does not
have / NR
62
Checking
account
Savings
account
Credit card
Investment
account
Foreign
currency
savings

One out of three Brazilians help his/her family with more
than remittance support, second only to Guyanese
immigrants (46.6%). Below average for this kind of help
are Mexicans, Cubans, Salvadorians and Guatemalans:
Help Beyond Remittances
50.0%
46.6%
45.0%
40.0%
35.0%
30.0%
25.0%
20.0%
15.0%
10.0%
5.0%
0.0%
63
36.80%
ABOVE AVERAGE
27.0%
22.7%
AVERAGE = 19.2%
20.0%
15.3%
14.0%
BELOW AVERAGE
10.3%
9.1%
5.7%
3.7%

The most common help besides remittances for almost all
L.A. and Caribbean immigrant communities including
Brazilians (37.1%) is payment of real state loans. However,
while all other groups’ next two forms of help include
student loans, loans to family or life and health insurance,
for Brazilians these places are taken with investmentrelated expenses (30.5%) and pension plan (15.2%):
Obligations beyond remittances
Brazil
Payment of real estate loans
37.10%
Other investment-related expenses
30.50%
Help with pension plan
15.20%
Charitable donations
11.40%
Payment of student loan
Ecuador
Guyana
Dominican R. Honduras Nicaragua
México Colombia El Salvador
24.00% 20.76%
12.67%
8.00%
7.33%
7.09%
6.00%
2.86%
1.43%
5.70%
Loan to family for investments
5.08%
0.67%
2.67%
2.67%
1.06%
5.00%
18.64%
1.33%
5.33%
3.33%
1.42%
6.00%
Guatemala
Cuba
0.92% 0.57%
2.29%
2.75% 2.29%
Life and health insurance
1.00%
2.97%
0.67%
4.00%
2.00%
0.35%
5.00%
0.95%
4.57%
Loan for business
1.00%
5.08%
0.67%
6.67%
2.00%
0.71%
4.00%
0.48%
0.57%
Rent payments
0.35%
Tuition for siblings
1st Obligation
64
1.00%
2nd Obligation
3rd Obligation

While L.A. and Caribbean immigrant support for
hometown associations average 6.7%, Brazilian support
for hometown associations is higher (12.4%) second only
to that of Guyanese immigrants (26.3%). Salvadorans and
Cubans display below average levels:
Support of Hometown Associations
30.0%
26.3%
25.0%
20.0%
15.0%
12.4%
ABOVE AVERAGE
10.0%
10.0%
AVERAGE = 6.7%
6.7%
5.0%
5.0%
4.0%
3.5%
3.3%
BELOW AVERAGE
2.8%
2.4%
0.0%
0.0%
65

Although voting in Brazil is an obligation and has been
extended to Brazilian immigrants, only one out of four
Brazilians (23.6%) vote in national elections:
Participation in National Elections
66

The vast majority of Brazilians (87.6%) watch TV or listen
to radio programs broadcasted from or originated in Brazil:
Watch TV or Listen to Radio Originated in Home Country
67

Three out of four Brazilians (72%) send or receive e-mails
form people back home. This is a very high internet usage
rate when compared to other Latinos (56%), non-Hispanic
whites (71%) and non-Hispanic blacks (60%)*:
Send or Receive E-mails from People in Home Country
* The Pew Hispanic Center, Latinos Online Report, 2007.
68

Almost every Brazilian with College degree (90.9%) sends
or receives e-mails from his/her country, while only half
(46.7%) of those who did not finished elementary school
are online:
E-mail Usage by Education
100.00%
90.90%
ABOVE AVERAGE
81.70%
90.00%
AVERAGE = 71.8%
80.00%
70.00%
69.80%
BELOW AVERAGE
70.00%
60.00%
46.70%
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
College Degree
69
Some College
High School
Elementary
School
Unfinished
Elementary
* Brazilians with College degree have a slightly lower usage rate than that of non-Hispanic whites (91%) and non-Hispanic blacks (93%) but higher than that of other Latinos (89%). Those with less than
Elementary school have a much higher rate than all other groups – non-Hispanic whites (25%); non-Hispanic blacks (32%) and Latinos (31%). The Pew Hispanic Center, Latinos Online Report, 2007.

Brazilians’ internet usage (72%) is above average and
second only to Jamaicans. Dominicans also have above
average usage with Mexicans and Guatemalans displaying
below average usage:
Internet Usage by Nationality
80.0%
76.5%
72.0%
70.0%
ABOVE AVERAGE
63.3%
60.0%
AVERAGE = 45%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0.0%
70
36.0%
34.0%
BELOW AVERAGE
31.0%
24.2%
23.0%
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