close

Se connecter

Se connecter avec OpenID

CMPT 105W: Process, Form, and Convention in …

IntégréTéléchargement
ENSC 105W:
PROCESS, FORM, AND CONVENTION
IN PROFESSIONAL GENRES
Library Research Workshop
Ivana Niseteo
Engineering and Computing Science Librarian
Burnaby campus
Fall 2015
Getting started with library research…
TWO QUESTIONS:
 Where can you search for information on your
topic?
 What library services are available to you as an
SFU student?
Efficient and effective research is about using
resources wisely.
Agenda






Library website www.lib.sfu.ca (Demo)
Finding your topic
Researching your topic
Evaluating your sources
Citing your sources and avoiding plagiarism
Getting help
Library website




Fast Search & Library Search
Catalogue
Databases
“Help” tab




Materials by subject (Engineering : ENSC 105W)
Citation guides (e.g. APA, IEEE)
Student Learning Commons (SLC)
Ask a librarian
Library website
Finding your topic
You will be writing a persuasive essay which argues
a social, political, or ethical position in relation to
engineering, computing or technology.
Browse:
 Wikipedia, Google
 Canadian Newsstand (newspaper articles)
 Academic Search Premier (general database)
Researching your topic
Sample research question:
Should employers be allowed to electronically monitor
employees?
Two keys to finding what you want:
 Good keywords to use for your search
 Good resources to use for your search
Researching your topic
Should employers be allowed to electronically monitor
employees?
 identify the main concepts


define synonyms



employees, electronic monitoring
performance monitoring, surveillance
workplace
define related terms

privacy, legislation, rights
Where to search for information
Background information:
 Books / e-books
 Reference books (e.g.,
encyclopedias)
 Reliable websites
 Newspaper articles
(e.g. Canadian Newsstand
database)

Magazine articles
Specific information:
 Book chapters
 Scholarly articles
 Government reports
(e.g. Canadian
Public Policy
Collection)

Statistical Information
(e.g. Statistics
Canada)
Background information

Encyclopedias, handbooks, textbooks
o

Fast Search or catalogue
o



Important for preliminary research: key authors,
readings, topics, scope
search by keywords for: encyclopedia + subject
ENSC 105W guide
The “Background information” tab of the
Engineering (or other) research guide
“Online reference sources” from library home page
Fast Search




Books (100% of our catalogue)
Journal articles
Newspaper and magazine articles
Music, movies, maps, slides, SFU theses, government
documents, sound recordings, and more
Fast Search



Good for a quick search
Retrieves a large number of hits of a wide range
For a more precise search, use the catalogue and
journal article databases
Finding books

Fast Search



keyword search
limit by “book/e-book”) (Demo)
Catalogue


keyword search
key feature: Subjects (click to find similar books)
Finding books : Call numbers




Located on book spines
Made up of a combination of meaningful letters
and numbers
Electrical engineering, Electronics, and Nuclear
engineering are in the TK1-9971 range,
e.g. TK 1001 A586 2010
Biomedical engineering is in the R856-857 range,
e.g. R 856 B322 2010
Finding books : Call numbers
Where to search for information
Background information:
 Books / e-books
 Reference books (e.g.
encyclopedias)
 Websites
 Newspaper articles
 Magazine articles
Specific information:
 Books
 Scholarly articles
 Government reports
 Statistics
What is the difference?
Scholarly publications








Original research (primary
research)
Written by academics
Written for academics,
researchers
Longer articles
Technical language, jargon
Always cites sources
Little to no advertising
Peer-Reviewed (Refereed)
Scholarly publications : Definition

Articles in scholarly journals are peer-reviewed

It means “quality control”
“Peer-reviewed journals are publications that include
only those articles that have been reviewed and/or
qualified by a selected panel of acknowledged
experts in the field of study covered by the journal” –
EBSCO


peer-reviewed articles = refereed articles
academic articles = scholarly articles
Popular publications







Informs or entertains
Sells products
Aimed at general public
Written by writers
(rarely subject experts)
Brief articles
Simple, non-technical
language
Rarely cites sources
Finding articles : Databases

Database = A large collection of records


Library subscribes to hundreds of multidisciplinary
and discipline-specific databases, including…



Google is a giant database
databases relevant to Engineering
Access via Library website
Check ENSC 105W guide to find the most relevant
ones
Finding articles : Databases
A few reasons to use academic databases:
 Contain peer-reviewed articles, free of charge
 Good for controlling your search – all have
controlled vocabulary : subject headings &
descriptors
 Higher data quality
 Mapped to a disciplinary perspective, so topically
relevant
Journal article record
Elements:
 Title, author(s)
 Abstract
 DOI number
 Subject terms

Use the link: “Where Can I Get This?” to get full-text
Where to search for information
Background information:
 Books
 Reference books (e.g.,
encyclopedias)
 Websites
 Newspaper articles
 Magazine articles
Specific information:
 Book chapters
 Scholarly articles
 Government reports
Evaluating websites (5 questions)
1. AUTHORITY: Who is the author?



Do you have a clear understanding of who the author
is?
What are the author’s academic or professional
credentials?
Does this make them qualified?
2. ACCURACY: Does the author cite his/her sources?


Can you verify the information elsewhere?
Are there spelling or grammatical mistakes?
_________________________________________
Source: BCIT Library Guide: Evaluating Web Sites
Evaluating websites (5 questions)
3. OBJECTIVITY: What is the purpose of the
website?
Who seems to be the website’s intended audience?
 How detailed is the information?
 Does the author provide broad, opinionated statements
without evidence?
 Is the web site an advertisement or promotional site?

Evaluating websites (5 questions)
4. CURRENCY:
How well is the site maintained? Links up-to-date?
 Does the site tell you when it was last updated?

5. COVERAGE:
How in-depth is the site?
 Does the site contribute something unique on the
subject?
 Look for content, continuity, scope, uniqueness of links to
other sources and quality of writing

Google Scholar

Search from the library’s home page to avoid being
prompted for payment
Writing your paper

If you need help with writing/structuring your paper
or quoting/paraphrasing documents, see the
Student Learning Commons.



Workshops
One-to-one appointments
Drop-in consultations
Avoiding plagiarism


If you include any ideas or sentences in your paper
that come from elsewhere, you need to
acknowledge those sources.
Avoid ‘patchwriting’



A form of plagiarism in which a writer relies too
heavily on the words and sentence structure of the
author’s original text.
Citing a document incorrectly is always better than
not citing it.
Leave yourself enough time to cite your sources.
Avoiding plagiarism
Don’t know how to correctly cite a document?



Feel free to ask a librarian for help
Make an appointment with the Student Learning
Commons
Take our interactive tutorial Understanding and
Avoiding Plagiarism http://bit.ly/1G3cnOv and test
your knowledge
Getting help



Use our Ask a Librarian services (via the Library home
page) to contact a librarian by:
 phone
 IM (AskAway) *extended hours
 In person (all three campuses)
Take advantage of our Research Guides
Email your librarian : Ivana Niseteo, iniseteo@sfu.ca
Thank you!
Ivana Niseteo
Liaison Librarian for Engineering and Computing Science
iniseteo@sfu.ca
Auteur
Document
Catégorie
Uncategorized
Affichages
7
Taille du fichier
2 098 KB
Étiquettes
1/--Pages
signaler