close

Se connecter

Se connecter avec OpenID

Aortic Event Rate in the Marfan Population: A Cohort

IntégréTéléchargement
Aortic Event Rate in the Marfan Population: A Cohort Study
Running title: Jondeau et al.; Aortic event rate in the Marfan population
Guillaume Jondeau, MD, PhD1,2,3,4; Delphine Detaint, MD1,2; Florence Tubach, MD, PhD 4,5,6;
Florence Arnoult, MD1,7; Olivier Milleron, MD1; Francois Raoux, MD1; Gabriel Delorme, MD1;
Lea Mimoun, MD1,2,4; Laura Krapf, MD1,2,4; Dalil Hamroun, PhD8,9;
Christophe Beroud, PharmD, PhD8,9; Carine Roy, MD5,6; Alec Vahanian, MD2,4;
Catherine Boileau, PharmD, PhD1,3,10
1
Centre de Référence pour le Syndrome de Marfan et Apparentés, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris
France; 2 Service de Cardiologie, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris France; 3 INSERM U698, Hôpital
Bichat, Paris, France; 4 Université Paris Diderot, France; 5 DEBRC, Hôpital Bichat AP-HP, Paris,
France; 6 INSERM CIE801, Paris, France; 7 Service d'Explorations Fonctionnelles, Hôpital
Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France; 8 INSERM, U827, CHU Montpellier, Hôpital Arnaud de
Villeneuve, Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire, Montpellier, F-34000 France; 9 Université
Montpellier1, Montpellier, France; 10 Laboratoire Central de Biochimie d’Hormonologie et de
Génétique Moléculaire, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, AP-HP, Boulogne, France
Correspondence:
Guillaume Jondeau, MD. PhD
Centre de Référence pour le Syndrome de Marfan et Apparentés
Hôpital Bichat
75018 Paris, France
Phone: + 33 1 40 25 68 11
Fax: +33 1 40 25 67 32
E-mail: guillaume.jondeau@bch.aphp.fr
Journal Subject Codes: [109] Clinical genetics; [35] CV surgery: aortic and vascular disease
1
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Abstract:
Background - Optimal management, including timing of surgery, remains debated in Marfan
syndrome (MFS), due to lack of data on aortic risk associated with this disease.
Methods and Results - We used our database to evaluate aortic risk associated with standardised
care. Patients who fulfilled the international criteria, had not had previous aortic surgery or
dissection and who came to our centre at least twice were included. Aortic measurements were
made using echocardiography (every 2 years); patients were given systematic beta-blockade and
advice about sports activities. Prophylactic aortic surgery was proposed when the maximal aortic
diameter reached 50 mm.
732 patients with MFS were followed up for a mean of 6.6 years. Five deaths and two
dissections of the ascending aorta occurred during follow-up. Event rate (death/aortic dissection)
was 0·17% per year. Risk rose with increasing aortic diameter measured within 2 years of the
event: from 0·09% per year (95% confidence interval 0.00–0·20) when the aortic diameter was
<40 mm, to 0·3% (0·00–0·71) with diameters of 45–49 mm, and 1·33% (0.00–3·93) with
diameters of 50-54 mm: the risk increased 4-times above 50 mm. The annual risk dropped below
0·05% when the aortic diameter was <50 mm, after exclusion of a neonatal patient, a woman
who became pregnant against our recommendation, and a 72-year-old woman with previous
myocardial infarction.
Conclusions - Risk of sudden death or aortic dissection remains low in patients with MFS and
aortic diameter between 45 and 49 mm. 50 mm appears to be a reasonable threshold for
prophylactic surgery.
Key words: Marfan Syndrome, Aorta, Aortic Dissection, Aortic Surgery
2
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Introduction
Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with a decreased life expectancy related
to the risk of aortic dissection and rupture leading to death.1 The life expectancy of these
individuals has increased tremendously, by 30 years, over the past 30 years.2 This improvement
is due to earlier diagnosis through increased clinical awareness, familial screening in
asymptomatic patients, improved pre-symptomatic diagnosis in family members due to greater
recognition of genetic mutations, and better evaluation of aortic risk by easy and reproducible
aortic imaging using two-dimensional echocardiography, computed tomography scanning, and
magnetic resonance imaging, allowing regular annual follow-up. These improvements have led
to scheduled, timely prophylactic aortic surgery, before aortic dissection or rupture. The optimal
timing for aortic surgery has been the subject of debate 3, but the 2 more recent task forces have
proposed 50 mm as a cut-off value for aortic diameter in terms of the timing of aortic root
replacement 4-5. The importance of the aortic diameter at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva as a
determinant of risk of an aortic event in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm is well
established6; it is widely agreed that this is the more accurate variable for assessment of risk of
aortic dissection or rupture in this population. However, no such data are available for patients
with Marfan syndrome.7 These data are important because aortic dissection may occur at
different diameters in patients with versus those without Marfan syndrome.8
Using data from a large population of patients with Marfan syndrome who fulfilled the
international criteria and were followed-up for >6 years, we calculated the annual aortic event
rate as a function of aortic root diameter, and propose the optimal timing for surgery.
3
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Methods
Patient population
Our outpatient reference centre for patients with Marfan syndrome and related syndromes
was established in 1996. The clinic offers complete diagnostic screening and follow-up of
patients in France. Over the course of 1 day at the clinic, each patient sees a cardiologist (and has
an echocardiogram), a geneticist (and blood is drawn for DNA analysis, if appropriate), an
ophthalmologist, and a paediatrician or rheumatologist, depending upon the patient’s age. Patient
data are recorded in a database.
Only patients who visited the centre at least twice and fulfilled the international Ghent nosology
criteria9 for Marfan syndrome were considered for this study. Patients were excluded from the
study if they had undergone aortic root surgery or presented a history of aortic dissection before
their first visit to the centre.
Follow-up
The policy is to schedule a follow-up visit at the clinic every 2 years, during which the
aortic root diameter is measured using echocardiography. In most cases, follow-up and aortic
measurement are carried out in alternate years by a private cardiologist (although some patients
are followed-up annually in our centre). Patients who miss scheduled visits are followed-up by
telephone to find out the reason.
Medical care
All patients diagnosed with Marfan syndrome are recommended beta-blocker therapy,10
irrespective of their aortic diameter (ie, whether or not it is dilated). In most cases, patients are
given atenolol at a target dose of 100 mg, which can be decreased in case of intolerance or
changed for another beta-blocker (usually bisoprolol or nebivolol at a target dose of 10 mg) or a
4
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
calcium antagonist (verapamil or diltiazem).
Patients are recommended to limit their levels of exercise and avoid competitive sports
and isometric exercises.11 Recreational jogging, cycling, and swimming are recommended. These
recommendations are for patients with Marfan syndrome who have not had an aortic event.
Surgical care
Prophylactic aortic surgery is proposed when the patients maximal aortic diameter
reaches •50 mm. Surgery has, however, been performed earlier in some cases, at the patient’s
request (including prophylactic aortic surgery before scheduled pregnancy), in patients with a
family history of early aortic dissection, or because of recommendations of surgeons from other
institutions.3
Aortic measurement
Echocardiography was performed by one of five trained echocardiographists on a
Sequoia (Siemens, Mountain View,CA, USA) or Vivid 7 (General Electrics, Horten, Norway)
ultrasound system. Adequate multifrequency transducers, ranging from 2–5 and 3–8 MHz, were
used. Patients were in lateral decubitus, in resting conditions. Aortic root diameters were
measured according to the latest 2005 American Society of Echography chamber quantification
guidelines,12 and Roman nomograms were used.13 The best parasternal great axis view was used,
in two-dimensional mode. Great care was taken to align the echocardiographic plane with the
aortic root and to obtain the largest aortic diameters. The aortic annulus was measured in systole
at the hinge point of the aortic leaflets. The sinuses of Valsalva, sino-tubular junction, and
proximal ascending aorta were measured in diastole, perpendicular to the long axis of the aorta,
using the leading-edge-to-leading-edge technique. Thus the measurements included the anterior
wall of the aorta and not the posterior wall. The largest of several measurements at each of the
5
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
four defined levels was recorded in the database. Measurements were done on-line and off-line,
using appropriate blown-up views for higher precision. Diameters were given in millimetres
(mm).
When the aortic-diameter measurement was thought to be unreliable by the cardiologist,
measurement using a different technique (usually computed tomography scanning or magnetic
resonance imaging, and less frequently transoesophageal echocardiography) was performed. This
rule was also followed when the aortic diameter changed significantly between two
measurements (confirmed by another technique).
The echocardiographic measurements were considered as the gold standard. Aortic diameter
standardised to body surface area (cm/m2)3,14 was calculated.
Aortic events
Aortic events were defined as dissection of the ascending aorta, death, or aortic surgery.
Death was classified as death related to aortic dissection, sudden death, non-cardiovascular
death, or death of unknown cause. Calculation of the aortic event rate was based and on the
whole population and solely on data from adult patients (aged •18 years).
Statistical analysis
Continuous data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and qualitative variables as
frequency and percentage. The validity of an aortic-diameter measurement was considered to last
for 2 years unless another measurement was performed in the meantime (ie, the aortic diameter
was considered to be constant over 2 years for the purposes of statistical analysis). The number
of patient-years for a defined range of aortic diameters was calculated as the sum of the number
of years during which every patient was within the defined range. Follow-up was censored after
the first event (aortic dissection, death, or surgery). The annual early aortic event rate was
6
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
calculated as the ratio of the number of aortic events divided by the number of patient-years for
each range of aortic diameter. Only events occurring at most 2 years after the last aortic
measurement in our centre were used for this calculation. Because of the low values, the results
are reported for 100 years (event%years); 95CI intervals were calculated according to the normal
distribution. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS 9.1 (SAS institute Inc, Cary, NC,
USA)
Results
Patient population
A total of 1097 patients who presented to the clinic between 1996 and 2010 fulfilled the
international diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome.
Of these patients, 243 only attended once, 92 had presented aortic dissection of the
ascending or descending aorta before their first visit, and 156 had undergone previous aortic
surgery; these patients were excluded from the study. Reason for surgery was aortic dissection in
84 (56% males, mean age at first visit 39.4 ± 10.9 years, mean age at the time of surgery 34.4 ±
11.6 years). In the 72 other patients (59.7% males, age at first visit 36.1 ± 12.7 years, mean age
at the time of surgery 30.2 years, mean diameter 61 ± 13 mm), the reason given for surgery was
aortic diameter above 50 mm, increase in diameter after pregnancy, symptomatic mitral or aortic
regurgitation. In 3 patients with preoperative aortic diameter below 50 mm no clear reason could
be obtained.
The population therefore comprised 732 patients, 345 (47·1%) of whom were men. Mean
age at first visit was 24·5 ± 16·4 years (range 0–80) (Figure 1); 82·1% received beta-blocker
therapy during follow-up. The aortic diameter at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva at the first
visit ranged from 17–67 mm (mean 37·4 ± 8·7, median 38 mm). The mean follow-up was 6·6 ±
7
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
4·3 years, median 5.6 years, IQR [2.8-10.1]; average increase in the sinuses of Valsalva was 0.50
± 0.89 mm/year.
Follow-up about hospitalisation, surgery or death was obtained for all patients but 15
(2%) patients including 8 who clearly stated that they did not want to be followed-up in our
centre any more. Only one of these 15 patients had an aortic diameter between 45 mm and 50
mm at his last visit to our centre.
Aortic events during follow-up
Over the course of the study, five patients died within 2 years of their previous visit:
x A boy with a severe form of Marfan syndrome (neonatal Marfan Syndrome) died at 3
years of age, after rapid aortic dilatation and important mitral valve regurgitation with heart
failure. His diameter at 1 year of age was measured at 22 mm.
x An 18-year-old woman, who was receiving beta-blocker therapy (nadolol 80 mg/d),
presented sudden death 3 months after her previous visit to our centre. Her aortic diameter
was stable at 33 mm, ie, 19·3 mm/m². No autopsy was performed.
x A 37-year-old man died suddenly, 4 months after his previous visit. His aortic diameter at
the level of Valsalva was 48 mm, ie, 23·3 mm/m². It was 46 mm 2 years earlier, and stable at
45 mm for the 6 preceding years. He was receiving beta-blocker therapy. Although an
autopsy was performed for police reasons, no precise cause of death was given.
x A 38-year-old woman died 7 months after her previous visit. She incurred acute aortic
dissection during pregnancy (amenorrhoea 25 weeks) and emergency surgery was
unsuccessful. Aortic diameter was 45 mm, ie, 22·7 mm/m². She had been informed about the
risks of pregnancy, which was considered as medically contraindicated. She also had a
history of phlebitis, and beta-blockade was limited to a low dose due to Raynaud’s
8
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
phenomenon.
x A 72-year-old woman died 2 years after her previous visit to our centre. She had
undergone two previous mitral valve replacements, a coronary artery bypass, and
percutaneous coronary artery dilatation during an anteroseptal myocardial infarction
complicated by acute heart failure necessitating intubation. Aortic measurements was 43 mm,
ie, 22·7 mm/m².
Two further patients required emergency aortic surgery (Bentall) because of aortic dissection
occurring within 2 years of their previous visit:
x A 56-year-old man had attended the clinic 1 year before the dissection. He had undergone
a previous mitral valve replacement (in 1981). Aortic diameter measurements remained
unchanged at 55 mm, ie, 25·4 mm/m² for 3 years. Aortic surgery had been proposed, but
systematically postponed by the patient.
x A 32-year-old woman had attended the clinic 1 year before the dissection. Her aortic
diameter was measured at 53 mm (ie, 31·7 mm/m²) and aortic regurgitation 2+ was noted. A
computed tomography scan was proposed but rejected by the patient, who did not return
subsequently to the clinic.
Overall, seven events occurred during 4110 years of patient follow-up: the mean annual risk of
death or aortic dissection was 0·17% in the overall population (0·12% risk of death and 0·05%
risk of aortic dissection). This risk dropped below 0·05% when only patients with an aortic
diameter <50 mm were considered (excluding data from two patients who postponed surgery
despite having aortic diameters >50 mm), after the exclusion of a neonatal patient, a woman who
became pregnant against medical advice, and a 72-year-old woman with a previous myocardial
infarction and multiple cardiac surgery (mitral valve replacement twice and 1 coronary artery by-
9
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
pass).
Additional events
Three patients (detailed below) who did not undergo surgery and were lost to regular
follow-up were reported to have died (ie, who died >2 years after their previous clinic visit).
Their deaths were not therefore used for the calculation of annual aortic risk.
x A 32-year-man died because of an acute aortic dissection, diagnosed at autopsy, 10 years
after his last visit to our centre. Last aortic measurement was 47 mm, ie, 25·5 mm/m². He did
not take any medication.
x A 35-year-old man died from aortic dissection 5 years after his last visit to our centre.
Last aortic measurement was 43 mm, ie, 21·6 mm/m².
x A 23-year-old man died from aortic rupture 3 years after his last visit. His maximal aortic
diameter was measured at 45 mm (28.8 mm/m²).
x A 41-year-old man died in a motorcycle accident 3 months after his last visit to the
centre. At that time the aortic diameter was 44 mm (20.2 mm/m²).
Aortic risk as a function of aortic diameter at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva
Annual risk of death or aortic dissection was calculated according to aortic diameter:
Figure 2 and Table 1. However, as surgery was recommended for diameters of 50 mm or more,
there remained only a small set of patients who delayed surgery and the confidence intervals are
much wider for diameters >50 mm.
Twenty nine patients underwent aortic surgery at a diameter measured between 45 and 50
mm with echocardiography. This was because a diameter exceeding 50 mm was measured using
another imaging technique (n=11), planned pregnancy (n=3), history of dissection in the family
(n=3), mitral regurgitation (n=2), aortic regurgitation (n=1), important increase in diameter
10
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
(n=1), planned surgery of the back (n=1), and official recommendations3 for surgical threshold
at 45 mm (n=7).
As the proposition has been made to use normalised aortic diameter by body surface area
(mm/m²), aortic risk was also calculated according to these values.3,6 The figures obtained should
be used with caution, as the decision to operate was not based upon this variable. Normalised
aortic diameter was associated with an aortic risk of 0·10% per year (95% confidence interval
0.0–0·3) when <20 mm/m²; 0·14% (0·03–0·27) for 20–30 mm/m², 0·43% (0.0–1·27) for 30–
42·5 mm/m², and 5·07% (0.0–15·01) for diameters above. The number of patient-years of
follow-up was very low above 42·5 mm/m² (19·7 years), rendering the data even more
unreliable. One has to keep in mind that aortic surgery was performed in this population as a
function of absolute aortic diameter (Figure 1B), i.e. >50 mm.
The same calculations based on data from adult patients (age •18 years) only gave similar
results: the risk of aortic dissection or death was 0·10% per year (95% confidence interval 0·00–
0·29) for an aortic diameter of 0–39 mm; 0·12% (0·00–0·34) for a diameter of 40–44 mm;
0·31% (0·00–0·74) for 45–49 mm; 1·37% (0·00–4·07) for 50–54 mm; and 8·14% (0·00–24·09)
for t55 mm.
Discussion
The main finding of our study is the low rate of aortic events in a population diagnosed
with Marfan syndrome according to the international criteria (Ghent nosology),9 when current
recommendations are applied, ie, systematic beta-blockade, advice about sports and physical
activity, regular aortic measurements with echocardiography, and prophylactic aortic root surgery
for an absolute aortic diameter of 50 mm.15 Using these rules, seven aortic events occurred
11
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
among 732 patients during a follow-up of 6·6 ± 4·3 years, leading to an annual risk of 0·17%.
This risk can be stratified according to aortic diameter as shown in Figure 2. When only patients
with aortic diameter <50 mm were considered, and excluding one neonatal patient with Marfan
syndrome, a pregnant woman with an aortic diameter of 45 mm, and a 72-year-old woman who
had undergone two previous surgeries and had had one acute myocardial infarction, the annual
risk was <0·05%. Preventing aortic dissection is critical as it is well established that previous
aortic dissection alters survival, particularly if dissected aorta remains after surgery 16, and this
short and long-term risk is to be compared with the risk of preventive aortic surgery which is low
in experienced centres.
Very few data are available about the real aortic risk in a population with an aneurysm of
the ascending aorta related to Marfan syndrome: from the Duke University database, the event
rate was concluded to be low when the maximal diameter was <60 mm in patients with thoracic
aortic aneurysm.6,14 According to the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection, limited to
patients in whom aortic dissection had occurred, aortic dissection was observed for diameters
<50 mm, indicating that this was still a possible event.8 However, reaching further conclusions
from this database is difficult, as one does not know how many patients with a similar aortic
diameter but without dissection were alive. Estimation of this number is difficult because in most
patients the condition can remain unrecognised, which also prevents them from benefiting from
preventive care, increasing their risk of aortic dissection or death. Early recognition of affected
individuals is possible in most patients with Marfan syndrome due to the genetic nature of the
disease and the familial screening. It is therefore theoretically easier to evaluate the actual risk of
aortic events in this population than in patients with aortic aneurysm from other causes.
However, owing to the rarity of the disease and the absence of large series, recommendations
12
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
have been based on cohorts of patients with aortic aneurysm of unknown cause and from expert
opinions, leading to inconsistencies.3-5 We hope that the data from our current series will help to
settle the debate.
In the Marfan population, a greater risk of aortic dissection has been associated with a larger
aortic diameter,17 the extension of dilatation beyond the sino-valsalva junction,18 a family history
of early aortic dissection,19 the presence of hypertension, the absence of beta-blockade,20 the
practice of intensive sports including body-building,21-22 the presence of sleep apnoea,23 and a
rapid increase in aortic diameter. We confirm that aortic risk appears related to aortic diameter
(Figure 1), but we could not evaluate the importance of other factors in this study for two
reasons. As the lessons derived from previous studies have been applied to our population, the
importance of previously recognised risk factors cannot be derived from the present study; for
example, treatment was given for hypertension, participation in intensive sports was discouraged,
and aortic surgery was proposed below the usual threshold if the aortic diameter was increasing
rapidly (provided that this increase was confirmed by a second imaging technique) or if aortic
dissection was documented in a family with an aortic diameter below the range of 50 mm. As a
result, the low event rate gives us insufficient power to perform a multivariable analysis. On the
other hand, our data validate the proposed scheme for medical care of patients with Marfan
syndrome. Our data also underscore the importance of precise measurement of aortic diameter in
these patients, with differences of few mm being significant, particularly regarding the indication
for surgery.
In the present study, we included only patients who were first seen in our clinic before the
occurrence of an aortic event or aortic surgery, indicating that the event rates are those observed
in a population with a recognised diagnosis, who were prescribed beta-blockade or calcium
13
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
inhibitor when not tolerated, were generally avoiding strenuous exercise, and were regularly
being evaluated. The findings may therefore differ from the spontaneous natural history of
patients with Marfan syndrome who are not benefiting from such care. However, from a practical
perspective, our data reflect the clinical impact of modern care in this population.
The efficiency of modern management of patients with Marfan syndrome underscores the
importance of early diagnosis, with the help of systematic familial screening, and, when
necessary and possible, molecular biology, to give the larger population the chance to benefit
from this type of management. The findings also indicate that the end-point in studies testing
new strategies or therapies should aim at delaying aortic dilatation and therefore surgery, and that
mortality is probably not a powerful endpoint in this population.24-27
Study limitations
This study was an observational study in a historical cohort. However, the data were
entered prospectively, and centralised healthcare organisation on rare diseases in France – aimed
at favouring epidemiological studies – as well as close collaboration with the French Marfan
Association (AFSMA), favour systematic reporting of events in this population to our centre,
even when patients are not followed-up regularly by our centre. Besides, only one patient with an
aortic diameter between 45 and 50 mm was lost to follow-up.
Conclusions
The results of our study suggest that modern medical care and scheduled surgery can
prevent aortic dissection in almost all patients with Marfan syndrome, provided that: betablockade is given to all patients; intensive sports activity is avoided; and annual
echocardiographic follow-up is provided. In patients with Marfan syndrome the risk of sudden
14
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
death or dissection remains low in patients with aortic dilatation between 45 and 49 mm
(~0.3%/year). The risk of sudden death or dissection is even lower (<0.05%/year) when
evaluated in a population of Marfan patients following modern care. Therefore 50 mm appears to
be a reasonable threshold for prophylactic surgery, in the absence of specific risk factors (e.g.
family history of dissection with mild dilatation) and underscores the importance of early
diagnosis, based on familial screening.
Acknowledgments: Sophie Rushton-Smith PhD provided editorial assistance on the final
version of this manuscript, limited to language editing, content checking, and formatting, and
was funded by the authors. We are grateful to Maria Tchitchinadze for her help with the database.
Funding Sources: French Ministry of Health (PHRC AOM09093) and Agence Nationale de la
Recherche (ANR 2010 BLAN 1129).
Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None
References:
1. Judge DP, Dietz HC. Marfan's syndrome. Lancet. 2005;366:1965-1976.
2. Pyeritz RE. Marfan syndrome: 30 years of research equals 30 years of additional life
expectancy. Heart. 2009;95:173-175.
3. Vahanian A, Baumgartner H, Bax J, Butchart E, Dion R, Filippatos G, Flachskampf F, Hall R,
Iung B, Kasprzak J, Nataf P, Tornos P, Torracca L, Wenink A. Guidelines on the management of
valvular heart disease: The Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease of the
European Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J. 2007;28:230-268.
4. Hiratzka LF, Bakris GL, Beckman JA, Bersin RM, Carr VF, Casey DE, Jr., Eagle KA,
Hermann LK, Isselbacher EM, Kazerooni EA, Kouchoukos NT, Lytle BW, Milewicz DM, Reich
DL, Sen S, Shinn JA, Svensson LG, Williams DM. 2010
ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM guidelines for the diagnosis and
management of patients with Thoracic Aortic Disease: a report of the American College of
Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines,
American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American College of Radiology, American Stroke
Association, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular
Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic
15
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Surgeons, and Society for Vascular Medicine. Circulation. 2010;121:e266-369.
5. Baumgartner H, Bonhoeffer P, De Groot NM, de Haan F, Deanfield JE, Galie N, Gatzoulis
MA, Gohlke-Baerwolf C, Kaemmerer H, Kilner P, Meijboom F, Mulder BJ, Oechslin E, Oliver
JM, Serraf A, Szatmari A, Thaulow E, Vouhe PR, Walma E, Vahanian A, Auricchio A, Bax J,
Ceconi C, Dean V, Filippatos G, Funck-Brentano C, Hobbs R, Kearney P, McDonagh T, Popescu
BA, Reiner Z, Sechtem U, Sirnes PA, Tendera M, Vardas P, Widimsky P, Swan L, Andreotti F,
Beghetti M, Borggrefe M, Bozio A, Brecker S, Budts W, Hess J, Hirsch R, Jondeau G, Kokkonen
J, Kozelj M, Kucukoglu S, Laan M, Lionis C, Metreveli I, Moons P, Pieper PG, Pilossoff V,
Popelova J, Price S, Roos-Hesselink J, Uva MS, Tornos P, Trindade PT, Ukkonen H, Walker H,
Webb GD, Westby J. ESC Guidelines for the management of grown-up congenital heart disease
(new version 2010): The Task Force on the Management of Grown-up Congenital Heart Disease
of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J. 2010.
6. Davies RR, Goldstein LJ, Coady MA, Tittle SL, Rizzo JA, Kopf GS, Elefteriades JA. Yearly
rupture or dissection rates for thoracic aortic aneurysms: simple prediction based on size. Ann
Thorac Surg. 2002;73:17-27; discussion 27-28.
7. Pearson GD, Devereux R, Loeys B, Maslen C, Milewicz D, Pyeritz R, Ramirez F, Rifkin D,
Sakai L, Svensson L, Wessels A, Van Eyk J, Dietz HC. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and
Blood Institute and National Marfan Foundation Working Group on research in Marfan
syndrome and related disorders. Circulation. 2008;118:785-791.
8. Pape LA, Tsai TT, Isselbacher EM, Oh JK, O'Gara P T, Evangelista A, Fattori R, Meinhardt G,
Trimarchi S, Bossone E, Suzuki T, Cooper JV, Froehlich JB, Nienaber CA, Eagle KA. Aortic
diameter >or = 5.5 cm is not a good predictor of type A aortic dissection: observations from the
International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD). Circulation. 2007;116:1120-1127.
9. De Paepe A, Devereux RB, Dietz HC, Hennekam RC, Pyeritz RE. Revised diagnostic criteria
for the Marfan syndrome. Am J Med Genet. 1996;62:417-426.
10. Jondeau G, Barthelet M, Baumann C, Bonnet D, Chevallier B, Collignon P, Dulac Y, Edouard
T, Faivre L, Germain D, Khau Van Kien P, Lacombe D, Ladouceur M, Lemerrer M, Leheup B,
Lupoglazoff JM, Magnier S, Muti C, Plauchu PH, Raffestin B, Sassolas F, Schleich JM, Sidi D,
Themar-Noel C, Varin J, Wolf JE. [Recommendations for the medical management of aortic
complications of Marfan's syndrome]. Arch Mal Coeur Vaiss. 2006;99:540-546.
11. Mitchell JH, Haskell W, Snell P, Van Camp SP. Task Force 8: classification of sports. J Am
Coll Cardiol. 2005;45:1364-1367.
12. Lang RM, Bierig M, Devereux RB, Flachskampf FA, Foster E, Pellikka PA, Picard MH,
Roman MJ, Seward J, Shanewise JS, Solomon SD, Spencer KT, Sutton MS, Stewart WJ.
Recommendations for chamber quantification: a report from the American Society of
Echocardiography's Guidelines and Standards Committee and the Chamber Quantification
Writing Group, developed in conjunction with the European Association of Echocardiography, a
branch of the European Society of Cardiology. J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2005;18:1440-1463.
16
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
13. Roman MJ, Devereux RB, Kramer-Fox R, O'Loughlin J. Two-dimensional
echocardiographic aortic root dimensions in normal children and adults. Am J Cardiol.
1989;64:507-512.
14. Davies RR, Gallo A, Coady MA, Tellides G, Botta DM, Burke B, Coe MP, Kopf GS,
Elefteriades JA. Novel measurement of relative aortic size predicts rupture of thoracic aortic
aneurysms. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;81:169-177.
15. Keane MG, Pyeritz RE. Medical management of Marfan syndrome. Circulation.
2008;117:2802-2813.
16. Mimoun L, Detaint D, Hamroun D, Arnoult F, Delorme G, Gautier M, Milleron O, Meuleman
C, Raoux F, Boileau C, Vahanian A, Jondeau G. Dissection in Marfan syndrome: the importance
of the descending aorta. Eur Heart J. 2011;32:443-449.
17. Gott VL, Greene PS, Alejo DE, Cameron DE, Naftel DC, Miller DC, Gillinov AM,
Laschinger JC, Pyeritz RE. Replacement of the aortic root in patients with Marfan's syndrome. N
Engl J Med. 1999;340:1307-1313.
18. Roman MJ, Rosen SE, Kramer-Fox R, Devereux RB. Prognostic significance of the pattern
of aortic root dilation in the Marfan syndrome. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993;22:1470-1476.
19. Silverman DI, Gray J, Roman MJ, Bridges A, Burton K, Boxer M, Devereux RB, Tsipouras
P. Family history of severe cardiovascular disease in Marfan syndrome is associated with
increased aortic diameter and decreased survival. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1995;26:1062-1067.
20. Shores J, Berger KR, Murphy EA, Pyeritz RE. Progression of aortic dilatation and the benefit
of long-term beta-adrenergic blockade in Marfan's syndrome. N Engl J Med. 1994;330:13351341.
21. Baumgartner FJ, Omari BO, Robertson JM. Weight lifting, Marfan's syndrome, and acute
aortic dissection. Ann Thorac Surg. 1997;64:1871-1872.
22. Turk UO, Alioglu E, Nalbantgil S, Nart D. Catastrophic cardiovascular consequences of
weight lifting in a family with Marfan syndrome. Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2008;36:32-34.
23. Kohler M, Blair E, Risby P, Nickol AH, Wordsworth P, Forfar C, Stradling JR. The
prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea and its association with aortic dilatation in Marfan's
syndrome. Thorax. 2009;64:162-166.
24. Detaint D, Aegerter P, Tubach F, Hoffman I, Plauchu H, Dulac Y, Faivre LO, Delrue MA,
Collignon P, Odent S, Tchitchinadze M, Bouffard C, Arnoult F, Gautier M, Boileau C, Jondeau G.
Rationale and design of a randomized clinical trial (Marfan Sartan) of angiotensin II receptor
blocker therapy versus placebo in individuals with Marfan syndrome. Arch Cardiovasc Dis.
2010;103:317-325.
17
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
25. Gambarin FI, Favalli V, Serio A, Regazzi M, Pasotti M, Klersy C, Dore R, Mannarino S,
Vigano M, Odero A, Amato S, Tavazzi L, Arbustini E. Rationale and design of a trial evaluating
the effects of losartan vs. nebivolol vs. the association of both on the progression of aortic root
dilation in Marfan syndrome with FBN1 gene mutations. J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown).
2009;10:354-362.
26. Lacro RV, Dietz HC, Wruck LM, Bradley TJ, Colan SD, Devereux RB, Klein GL, Li JS,
Minich LL, Paridon SM, Pearson GD, Printz BF, Pyeritz RE, Radojewski E, Roman MJ, Saul JP,
Stylianou MP, Mahony L. Rationale and design of a randomized clinical trial of beta-blocker
therapy (atenolol) versus angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy (losartan) in individuals with
Marfan syndrome. Am Heart J. 2007;154:624-631.
27. Radonic T, de Witte P, Baars MJ, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Groenink M. Losartan
therapy in adults with Marfan syndrome: study protocol of the multi-center randomized
controlled COMPARE trial. Trials. 2010;11:3.
Table 1. Annual aortic risk as a function of maximal aortic diameter measured at the level of the
sinuses of Valsalva using echocardiography within 2 years. Aortic event without surgery includes
death (cardiovascular death, including sudden or of unknown cause) or aortic dissection. Surgery
refers to aortic surgery with or without valve replacement.
Aortic event without surgery
Aortic diameter (mm)
0–39
40–44
45–49
50–54
55–59
Aortic event including
surgery
Aortic diameter (mm)
0–39
40–44
45–49
50–54
55–59
Patients
(n)
Event
number
Patient-years
Annual risk (%) [CI 95%]
of follow-up
423
219
157
54
14
2
1
2
1
1
2353
995
675
75
12
0·09 [0·00–0·20]
0·10 [0·00–0·30]
0·30 [0·00–0·71]
1·33 [0·00–3·93]
8·14 [0·00–24·10]
423
219
157
54
14
7
3
31
39
12
2353
995
675
75
12
0·30 [0·08–0·52]
0·30 [0·00–0·64]
4·59 [2·98–6·21]
51·75 [35·51–68·00]
97·68 [42·41–100·00]
18
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Figure Legends:
Figure 1. Age of the population at the (A) first and (B) last visit.
Figure 2. Event rates and 95% confidence interval according to aortic diameter measured at the
level of the sinuses of Valsalva: (A) death or aortic dissection; and (B) aortic surgery, death, or
aortic dissection. Aortic surgery was performed for aortic dilatation.
19
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
A
B
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
B
A
100
20
Risk of surgery, death or aortic dissection % years
Risk of death or aortic dissection % years
25
15
10
5
0
75
50
25
0
0-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
Aortic diameter (mm)
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
0-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
Aortic diam eter (m m )
55-59
Aortic Event Rate in the Marfan Population: A Cohort Study
Guillaume Jondeau, Delphine Detaint, Florence Tubach, Florence Arnoult, Olivier Milleron, Francois
Raoux, Gabriel Delorme, Lea Mimoun, Laura Krapf, Dalil Hamroun, Christophe Beroud, Carine Roy,
Alec Vahanian and Catherine Boileau
Circulation. published online December 1, 2011;
Circulation is published by the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231
Copyright © 2011 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.
Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539
The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on the
World Wide Web at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2011/11/30/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.054676
Data Supplement (unedited) at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2013/10/17/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.054676.DC1.html
Permissions: Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published in
Circulation can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial Office.
Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located, click Request
Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about this process is
available in the Permissions and Rights Question and Answer document.
Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at:
http://www.lww.com/reprints
Subscriptions: Information about subscribing to Circulation is online at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 24, 2016
Page 308
Chirurgie cardiovasculaire
Incidence des événements aortiques chez les patients atteints
d’un syndrome de Marfan
Une étude de cohorte
Guillaume Jondeau, MD, PhD ; Delphine Détaint, MD ; Florence Tubach, MD, PhD ;
Florence Arnoult, MD ; Olivier Milleron, MD ; François Raoux, MD ; Gabriel Delorme, MD ;
Lea Mimoun, MD ; Laura Krapf, MD ; Dalil Hamroun, PhD ; Christophe Béroud, PharmD, PhD ;
Carine Roy, MD ; Alec Vahanian, MD ; Catherine Boileau, PharmD, PhD
Contexte—Les modalités optimales de prise en charge du syndrome de Marfan et, notamment, le seuil à partir duquel doit
être posée l’indication du traitement chirurgical continuent à faire débat en raison du manque de données sur le risque
d’événement aortique associé à cette affection.
Méthodes et résultats—En nous appuyant sur notre base de données, nous avons évalué le risque aortique associé à la prise en
charge standard. Seuls ont été retenus les patients qui satisfaisaient aux critères internationaux, n’avaient pas d’antécédent
d’intervention chirurgicale sur l’aorte ni de dissection aortique et avaient effectué au moins deux consultations dans notre
centre. Le diamètre de l’aorte a été régulièrement mesuré par échocardiographie (tous les deux ans) ; les patients ont tous
bénéficié d’un traitement bêtabloquant ainsi que de recommandations concernant la pratique d’activités sportives. Une
intervention chirurgicale à visée préventive leur a été proposée lorsque le diamètre maximal de l’aorte atteignait 50 mm.
L’étude a porté sur 732 patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan qui ont été suivis pendant une durée moyenne de 6,6
ans. Cinq décès et deux dissections de l’aorte ascendante ont été enregistrés pendant le suivi. Le taux annuel d’événements
(décès ou dissection aortique) a été de 0,17 %. Le risque a augmenté parallèlement à l’augmentation du diamètre aortique
au cours des deux ans ayant précédé l’événement : de 0,09 % par an (intervalle de confiance [IC] à 95 % : 0,00 à 0,20)
lorsque ce diamètre était inférieur à 40 mm, il est passé à 0,3 % (IC à 95 % : 0,00 à 0,71) pour des diamètres compris entre
45 et 49 mm et à 1,33 % (IC à 95 %, 0,00 à 3,93) pour des diamètres compris entre 50 et 54 mm. Le risque a été 4 fois
supérieur lorsque le diamètre atteignait 50 mm ou plus. Le risque annuel associé aux diamètres aortiques inférieurs à 50
mm est descendu en dessous de 0,05 % après exclusion d’un nouveau-né, d’une femme devenue enceinte malgré nos
recommandations et d’une femme de 72 ans qui avait été précédemment victime d’un infarctus du myocarde.
Conclusions—Le risque de mort subite ou de dissection aortique demeure faible chez les patients atteints d’un syndrome de
Marfan et dont le diamètre aortique est compris entre 45 et 49 mm. Un diamètre de 50 mm semble être un seuil
raisonnable pour poser l’indication d’une intervention chirurgicale préventive. (Traduit de l’anglais : Aortic Event Rate in
the Marfan Population. A Cohort Study. Circulation. 2012;125:226–232.)
Mots clés : aorte 䊏 anévrisme de l’aorte, thoracique familial 䊏 syndrome de Marfan
e syndrome de Marfan est une maladie génétique associée
à une diminution de l’espérance de vie du fait du risque
de dissection ou de rupture de l’aorte, dont la sanction est le
décès.1 Au cours des trente dernières années, l’espérance
de vie des patients a toutefois considérablement augmenté,
l’augmentation ayant été de l’ordre de 30 ans.2 Cette
amélioration tient au fait que le diagnostic est porté plus tôt
en raison de la meilleure connaissance qu’ont les médecins de
la maladie, du dépistage familial réalisé chez les individus
asymptomatiques, de l’amélioration du diagnostic avant
apparition des symptômes parmi les membres de la famille,
grâce aux progrès accomplis dans l’identification des
mutations génétiques, et de l’appréciation plus précise du
risque aortique qu’autorisent désormais les techniques
d’imagerie de mise en œuvre aisée et reproductible que sont
l’échocardiographie bidimensionnelle, la tomodensitométrie
et l’imagerie par résonance magnétique, ce qui rend possible
un suivi annuel régulier. Ces progrès permettent, en outre, de
programmer en temps utile la réalisation d’une intervention
chirurgicale aortique à visée préventive, avant que la
dissection ou la rupture de l’artère ne se produise. Le moment
optimal où doit être posée l’indication du traitement
chirurgical demeure l’objet de débats3 ; toutefois, deux
groupes de travail ont récemment proposé de retenir un
L
Reçu le 8 juillet 2011 ; accepté le 18 novembre 2011.
Centre de Référence pour le Syndrome de Marfan et Apparentés, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris (G.J., D.D., F.A., O.M., F.R., G.D., L.M., L.K., C.
Boileau) ; Service de Cardiologie, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris (G.J., D.D., L.M., L.K., A.V.) ; INSERM U698, Hôpital Bichat, Paris (G.J., C. Boileau);
Université Paris Diderot, Paris (G.J., F.T., L.M., L.K., A.V.) ; DEBRC, Hôpital Bichat AP-HP, Paris (F.T., C.R.) ; INSERM CIE801, Paris (F.T., C.R.) ;
Service d’Explorations Fonctionnelles, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris (F.A.) ; INSERM, U827, CHU de Montpellier, Hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve,
Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire, Montpellier (D.H., C. Béroud) ; Université de Montpellier 1, Montpellier (D.H., C. Béroud) ; et Laboratoire Central
de Biochimie, d’Hormonologie et de Génétique Moléculaire, Hôpital Ambroise-Paré, AP-HP, Boulogne (C. Boileau), France.
Correspondance : Guillaume Jondeau, MD, PhD, Centre de Référence pour le Syndrome de Marfan et Apparentés, Hôpital Bichat, 75018 Paris, France.
E-mail : guillaume.jondeau@bch.aphp.fr
© 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.
Circulation est disponible sur le site http://circ.ahajournals.org
308
10:00:26:07:12
Page 308
Page 309
Jondeau et al
Incidence des événements aortiques chez les patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan
diamètre aortique de 50 mm comme seuil à partir duquel le
remplacement de la racine de l’aorte doit être envisagé.4,5 Il est
pleinement établi que le diamètre de l’artère mesuré au niveau
des sinus de Valsalva est un important facteur conditionnant
le risque d’événement aortique chez les patients présentant un
anévrysme de l’aorte ascendante ;6 il est tout aussi largement
admis qu’il s’agit du paramètre permettant l’évaluation la plus
précise du risque de dissection ou de rupture aortique chez les
individus en question. Toutefois, aucune donnée de ce type
n’est disponible s’agissant des patients atteints d’un syndrome
de Marfan.7 Ces informations sont importantes à connaître,
car, chez ces derniers, la dissection aortique peut survenir
pour des diamètres différents de ceux observés chez les sujets
ne présentant pas de syndrome de Marfan.8
En nous appuyant sur les données recueillies dans une vaste
population de patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan qui
satisfaisaient aux critères internationaux et avaient été suivis
sur une période supérieure à 6 ans, nous avons calculé les taux
annuels d’événements aortiques survenus en fonction du
diamètre de la racine aortique de manière à définir le seuil
optimal d’intervention chirurgicale.
Méthodes
Population de patients
Notre centre de référence en matière de prise en charge ambulatoire
des patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan ou d’une affection
apparentée a été créé en 1996. Le centre assure le dépistage diagnostique et le suivi complets des patients résidant en France. Lors
d’un séjour d’une journée, les patients sont vus par un cardiologue (et
font l’objet d’une échocardiographie), un généticien (avec recueil, le
cas échéant, d’un prélèvement sanguin en vue d’une analyse d’ADN),
un ophtalmologue et, selon leur âge, un pédiatre ou un rhumatologue.
Les données de chaque patient sont saisies dans une base de données.
Seuls ont été inclus dans l’étude les patients ayant effectué au moins
deux consultations dans notre centre et qui satisfaisaient aux critères
nosologiques internationaux définis à Gand9 en matière de syndrome
de Marfan. Nous avons écarté les patients qui avaient fait l’objet d’une
intervention chirurgicale sur la racine aortique ou avaient présenté une
dissection aortique avant leur première consultation au centre.
Suivi
Notre politique de suivi consiste à programmer, tous les deux ans, une
consultation de contrôle au cours de laquelle le diamètre de la racine
aortique est mesuré par échocardiographie. Dans la plupart des cas,
pendant l’année intercalaire, le suivi et l’évaluation du diamètre
aortique sont assurés par un cardiologue libéral (bien que quelques
patients soient suivis annuellement dans notre centre). Les patients
qui ne se sont pas présentés à une consultation programmée sont
contactés par téléphone afin d’en connaître le motif.
Traitement médical
Un traitement bêtabloquant10 est proposé à tous les patients chez
lesquels un syndrome de Marfan a été diagnostiqué et ce, quel que soit
leur diamètre aortique (c’est-à-dire que l’artère soit dilatée ou non).
Le plus souvent, l’aténolol leur est prescrit, à la dose cible de 100 mg ;
en cas d’intolérance, on peut être conduit à diminuer la dose ou
à remplacer l’aténolol par un autre bêtabloquant (généralement
le bisoprolol ou le nébivolol à la dose cible de 10 mg) ou par un
inhibiteur calcique (le vérapamil ou le diltiazem).
Il est, par ailleurs, conseillé aux patients de limiter leur niveau
d’activité physique et de proscrire les sports de compétition et
les exercices isométriques.11 Les sports de loisirs que nous
recommandons sont le jogging, le cyclisme et la natation. Ces
recommandations s’adressent aux patients atteints d’un syndrome
de Marfan qui n’ont encore jamais présenté d’événement aortique.
10:00:26:07:12
Page 309
309
Traitement chirurgical
Une intervention chirurgicale aortique à visée préventive est proposée
aux patients lorsque le diamètre maximal de l’aorte atteint 50 mm ou
plus. Toutefois, le traitement chirurgical est parfois pratiqué plus tôt,
à la demande de l’intéressé(e) (notamment s’il s’agit d’une femme
qui souhaite programmer une grossesse), lorsque le patient a des
antécédents familiaux de dissection aortique précoce ou si cela est
préconisé par un chirurgien exerçant dans un autre établissement.3
Mesure des dimensions aortiques
Les échocardiographies ont été réalisées par l’un de nos cinq échocardiographistes expérimentés au moyen d’un appareil de type
Sequoia (Siemens, Mountain View, Californie, Etats-Unis) ou Vivid 7
(General Electric, Horten, Norvège). Il a été fait usage de sondes à
larges bandes dont les fréquences s’étendaient respectivement de 2 à 5
MHz et de 3 à 8 MHz. Les patients ont été placés en décubitus latéral
dans des conditions de repos. Le diamètre de la racine aortique a été
mesuré conformément aux dernières recommandations formulées
en 2005 par l’American Society of Echocardiography en matière
d’évaluation quantitative des cavités cardiaques,12 en utilisant les
nomogrammes proposés par Roman.13 Les images ont été acquises en
mode bidimensionnel en retenant la meilleure incidence parasternale.
L’opérateur a veillé à aligner le plan échocardiographique sur la
racine aortique et à sélectionner le plus grand diamètre de l’aorte.
L’anneau aortique a été mesuré pendant la systole à son union avec
les feuillets aortiques. Les sinus de Valsalva, la jonction sino-tubulaire
et la portion proximale de l’aorte ascendante ont été mesurés pendant
la diastole perpendiculairement au grand axe de l’aorte en employant
la technique dite « bord d’attaque à bord d’attaque ». Ce faisant, les
mesures ont englobé la paroi antérieure de l’aorte et non sa paroi
postérieure. C’est le plus grand des différents diamètres mesurés à
chacun des quatre niveaux prédéfinis qui a été saisi dans la base de
données. Les mesures ont été pratiquées en ligne et en différé sur des
images agrandies de manière à obtenir une plus grande précision. Les
diamètres ont été exprimés en millimètres.
Lorsque la mesure du diamètre aortique était jugée incohérente par
le cardiologue, elle a été pratiquée une seconde fois en utilisant une
technique différente (généralement, une tomodensitométrie ou une
imagerie par résonance magnétique et, plus rarement, une échocardiographie transœsophagienne). La même règle a été appliquée
dans les cas où le diamètre aortique différait significativement d’une
mesure à l’autre (avec confirmation par une autre technique).
Les mesures échocardiographiques ont été considérées comme
l’approche de référence. Nous avons calculé le diamètre aortique
corrigé en fonction de la surface corporelle (cm/m2 ).3,14
Evénements aortiques
Les événements aortiques retenus ont été la dissection de l’aorte
ascendante, le décès et la chirurgie aortique. Les décès ont été classés
en décès liés à une dissection aortique, morts subites, décès d’origine
non cardiovasculaire et décès de cause inconnue. Les taux
d’événements aortiques ont été calculés à partir de la population
totale en ne retenant que les données relatives aux patients adultes
(c’est-à-dire âgés de 18 ans ou plus).
Analyse statistique
Les données continues sont présentées sous forme de moyennes ± ET
et les variables qualitatives sous forme de fréquences et de pourcentages. La validité des mesures de diamètre aortique a été fixée à
2 ans, à moins qu’une autre mesure n’ait été effectuée entre-temps (ce
qui signifie que, pour les besoins de l’analyse statistique, le diamètre
aortique a été considéré comme étant demeuré constant pendant
2 ans). Le nombre d’années-patients correspondant à une fourchette
donnée de diamètres aortiques a été calculé en additionnant les
nombres d’années pendant lesquelles chaque patient était demeuré
dans les limites en question. Le suivi a été censuré à la date du premier
événement (dissection aortique, décès ou intervention chirurgicale).
L’incidence annuelle des événements aortiques précoces a été calculée
en divisant le nombre d’événements aortiques par le nombre
Page 310
310
Circulation
Septembre 2012
d’années-patients pour chaque fourchette de diamètres aortiques.
Seuls ont été employés pour ce calcul les événements survenus dans les
2 ans ayant suivi la dernière mesure de diamètre aortique effectuée
dans notre centre. En raison des faibles taux d’événements enregistrés,
les résultats sont présentés pour 100 années (années pour cent
d’événements) ; les intervalles de confiance à 95 % (IC à 95 %) ont été
calculés selon la distribution normale. Les analyses statistiques ont été
effectuées au moyen d’un logiciel SAS 9.1 (SAS institute Inc, Cary,
Caroline du Nord, Etats-Unis).
Résultats
Population de patients
Au total, 1 097 patients venus en consultation dans notre
centre entre 1996 et 2010 satisfaisaient aux critères internationaux de diagnostic du syndrome de Marfan. Parmi eux,
243 n’avaient consulté qu’une seule fois, 92 avaient présenté
une dissection de l’aorte ascendante ou descendante
antérieurement à leur première consultation et 156 avaient fait
l’objet d’un geste chirurgical sur l’aorte ; tous ces patients ont
été exclus de l’étude. Les interventions chirurgicales avaient
été consécutives à la survenue d’une dissection aortique dans
84 des 156 cas (56 % d’hommes ; âge moyen à la première
consultation : 39,4 ± 10,9 ans ; âge moyen à la date de la
chirurgie : 34,4 ± 11,6 ans). Chez les 72 autres patients (59,7 %
d’hommes ; âge à la première consultation : 36,1 ± 12,7 ans ;
âge moyen à la date de la chirurgie : 30,2 ans ; diamètre aortique moyen : 61 ± 13 mm), l’intervention avait été motivée
par un diamètre aortique supérieur à 50 mm, l’augmentation
de ce dernier après une grossesse ou une insuffisance mitrale
ou aortique symptomatique. Chez 3 patients dont le diamètre
aortique préopératoire était inférieur à 50 mm, les raisons
ayant conduit à l’opération n’ont pu être clairement établies.
La population de l’étude comptait donc 732 patients, dont
345 (47,1 %) étaient des hommes. L’âge moyen à la première
consultation était de 24,5 ± 16,4 ans (extrêmes : 0–80 ans ;
Figure 1) ; 82,1 % des patients on reçu un traitement bêtabloquant au cours du suivi. Le diamètre aortique mesuré
au niveau des sinus de Valsalva à la première consultation
était compris entre 17 et 67 mm (moyenne : 37,4 ± 8,7 mm ;
médiane : 38 mm). Le suivi moyen a été de 6,6 ± 4,3 ans
(médiane : 5,6 ans ; bornes interquartiles : 2,8 à 10,1 ans) ;
l’augmentation annuelle moyenne au niveau des sinus de
Valsalva a été de 0,50 ± 0,89 mm.
Le suivi des hospitalisations, des interventions chirurgicales
et des décès a pu être effectué pour tous les patients sauf
15 (2 %), dont 8 avaient clairement fait état de leur volonté de
ne plus être suivis par notre centre. Un seul de ces 15 patients
présentait un diamètre aortique compris entre 45 et 50 mm
lors de sa dernière consultation dans notre centre.
Evénements aortiques survenus pendant le suivi
Au cours de l’étude, 5 patients sont décédés dans les 2 ans
ayant suivi leur dernière consultation :
1. Un garçonnet atteint d’une forme sévère de syndrome
de Marfan (syndrome néonatal) est décédé à l’âge de 3
ans des suites de la survenue rapide d’une dilatation
aortique accompagnée d’une importante insuffisance
mitrale et d’une insuffisance cardiaque. Le diamètre
aortique mesuré à l’âge d’un an était de 22 mm.
10:00:26:07:12
Page 310
Figure 1. Ages de la population aux première (A) et dernière (B)
consultations.
2. Une adolescente de 18 ans qui était traitée par bêtabloquant (nadolol à la posologie de 80 mg/jour) est
décédée brutalement 3 mois après sa dernière visite à
notre centre. Son diamètre aortique était stable à 33 mm,
soit 19,3 mm/m2. Aucune autopsie n’a été pratiquée.
3. Un homme de 37 ans est décédé subitement 4 mois après
sa dernière visite. Son diamètre aortique au niveau des
sinus de Valsalva était de 48 mm, soit 23,3 mm/m2.
Il était de 46 mm 2 ans auparavant et était demeuré
stable à 45 mm au cours des 6 années antérieures. Ce
patient recevait un traitement bêtabloquant. Bien qu’une
autopsie ait été pratiquée pour des raisons judiciaires,
le décès n’a pu être rattaché à aucune cause précise.
4. Une femme de 38 ans est décédée 7 mois après sa dernière
visite. Elle a présenté une dissection aortique aiguë alors
qu’elle était enceinte (25 semaines d’aménorrhée) et
l’intervention chirurgicale pratiquée en urgence n’a pas
permis de la sauver. Son diamètre aortique était de
45 mm, soit 22,7 mm/m2. Cette patiente avait été
informée des risques liés à la survenue d’une grossesse,
laquelle était jugée médicalement contre-indiquée. Cette
femme avait également des antécédents de phlébite et
le traitement bêtabloquant lui était prescrit à faible dose
car elle présentait un phénomène de Reynaud.
5. Une femme de 72 ans est décédée 2 ans après sa dernière
visite à notre centre. Elle avait précédemment fait l’objet
de deux remplacements valvulaires mitraux ainsi que
d’un pontage coronaire et d’une dilatation coronaire
percutanée à la suite d’un infarctus myocardique
antéroseptal compliqué d’une insuffisance cardiaque
Page 311
Jondeau et al
Incidence des événements aortiques chez les patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan
aiguë ayant nécessité une intubation. Son diamètre
aortique était de 43 mm, soit 22,7 mm/m2.
Deux autres patients ont dû être opérés en urgence (intervention de Bentall) d’une dissection aortique survenue dans
les 2 ans ayant suivi la dernière consultation :
1. Un homme de 56 ans s’était présenté à notre centre un
an avant la dissection. Il avait précédemment fait l’objet
d’un remplacement valvulaire mitral (en 1981). Les
mesures de son diamètre étaient demeurées inchangées
à 55 mm (soit 25,4 mm/m2 ) pendant 3 ans. Une chirurgie
aortique lui avait été proposée, mais il l’avait
systématiquement différée.
2. Une femme de 32 ans s’était présentée à notre centre un
an avant la dissection. Son diamètre aortique avait été
estimé à 53 mm (soit 31,7 mm2 ) et une insuffisance
aortique de grade 2+ avait été diagnostiquée. Une
tomodensitométrie avait été proposée à cette patiente,
mais elle l’avait refusée et n’était plus revenue dans notre
centre.
Au total, 7 événements sont survenus au cours de 4 110
années de suivi des patients ; le risque moyen annuel de décès
ou de dissection aortique dans la population totale a été
estimé à 0,17 % (risque de décès : 0,12 % ; risque de dissection
aortique : 0,05 %). Le risque est descendu en dessous de
0,05 % lorsque seuls ont été pris en compte les patients dont le
diamètre aortique était inférieur à 50 mm (après exclusion des
données de deux patients qui avaient repoussé l’intervention
chirurgicale bien que leur diamètre aortique ait excédé
50 mm), cela après avoir écarté de l’analyse un nouveau-né,
une femme devenue enceinte contre avis médical et une
patiente de 72 ans qui avait été précédemment victime d’un
infarctus du myocarde et avait fait l’objet de plusieurs
interventions de chirurgie cardiaque (deux remplacements
valvulaires mitraux successifs et un pontage coronaire).
Autres événements
Il nous a été communiqué que trois patients (décrits ci-après)
n’ayant pas été opérés et que nous avions perdus de vue
étaient décédés (ce qui signifie que ces décès étaient survenus
plus de 2 ans après la dernière consultation effectuée dans
notre centre). Ces décès n’ont donc pas été pris en compte
pour calculer le risque annuel d’événements aortiques.
1. Un homme de 32 ans est décédé d’une dissection
aortique aiguë, diagnostiquée à l’autopsie, 10 ans après sa
dernière visite à notre centre. Lors de cette consultation,
son diamètre aortique avait été estimé à 47 mm, soit 25,5
mm/m2. Ce patient ne prenait aucun médicament.
2. Un homme de 35 ans est décédé d’une dissection
aortique 5 ans après sa dernière visite à notre centre.
Lors de cette consultation, son diamètre aortique avait
été estimé à 43 mm, soit 21,6 mm/m2.
3. Un homme de 23 ans est décédé d’une rupture de l’aorte
3 ans après sa dernière visite. Son diamètre aortique
maximal avait alors été estimé à 45 mm (28,8 mm/m2 ).
4. Un homme de 41 ans est décédé d’un accident de moto
3 mois après sa dernière visite au centre. Lors de cette
consultation, son diamètre aortique avait été estimé
à 44 mm (20,2 mm/m2 ).
10:00:26:07:12
Page 311
311
Risque aortique en fonction du diamètre aortique
mesuré au niveau des sinus de Valsalva
Le risque annuel de décès ou de dissection aortique a été
calculé en fonction du diamètre aortique (Figure 2 et
Tableau). Toutefois, étant donné que l’intervention
chirurgicale était systématiquement proposée lorsque le
diamètre aortique atteignait 50 mm ou plus, seul un petit
groupe de patients qui avaient souhaité surseoir à l’opération
présentait encore de tels diamètres aortiques, de sorte que les
IC sont beaucoup plus larges.
Chez 29 patients, une chirurgie aortique a été pratiquée
alors que le diamètre aortique mesuré par échocardiographie
était compris entre 45 et 50 mm. Les raisons ayant présidé à
ces interventions ont respectivement été un diamètre aortique
qui, mesuré par une autre technique d’imagerie, s’était révélé
supérieur à 50 mm (n = 11), un désir de grossesse (n = 3),
l’existence d’antécédents familiaux de dissection aortique
(n = 3), une insuffisance mitrale (n = 2), une insuffisance
aortique (n = 1), une importante augmentation du diamètre
(n = 1), la programmation d’une intervention chirurgicale au
niveau du dos (n = 1) et l’application d’une recommandation
officielle3 fixant le seuil d’intervention à 45 mm (n = 7).
Comme certains ont proposé d’utiliser le diamètre aortique
corrigé en fonction de la surface corporelle (mm/m2 ), nous
avons également estimé le risque d’événement aortique en
nous fondant sur ces valeurs.3,6 Les mesures ainsi obtenues
doivent être employées avec circonspection dans la mesure où
les décisions d’opérer n’ont pas été prises en fonction de cette
variable. Le risque annuel d’événement aortique a été estimé à
0,10 % (IC à 95 % : 0,0 à 0,3) lorsque ce diamètre aortique
Tableau. Risque aortique annuel en fonction du diamètre
aortique maximal mesuré au niveau des sinus de Valsalva
par échocardiographie à 2 ans
Page 312
312
Circulation
Septembre 2012
Figure 2. Taux d’événement et intervalles de confiance à 95 % en fonction du diamètre aortique mesuré au niveau des sinus de Valsalva :
(A) décès ou dissection aortique et (B) chirurgie aortique, décès ou dissection aortique. Les interventions chirurgicales ont été pratiquées
lorsqu’il existait une dilatation aortique.
normalisé était inférieur à 20 mm/m2, à 0,14 % (IC à 95 % :
0,03 à 0,27) lorsque le diamètre était compris entre 20 et
30 mm/m2, à 0,43 % (IC à 95 % : 0,0 à 1,27) lorsqu’il était
compris entre 30 et 42,5 mm/m2 et à 5,07 % (IC à 95 % :
0,0 à 15,01) lorsqu’il était supérieur à ces chiffres. Le nombre
d’années-patients de suivi a été très faible pour les patients
dont le diamètre aortique excédait 42,5 mm/m2 (19,7 ans),
ce qui réduit encore davantage la fiabilité des estimations.
Il convient d’avoir à l’esprit que, dans ce sous-groupe de
patients, l’indication d’une chirurgie aortique a été posée sur
la base du diamètre aortique absolu (Figure 1B), c’est-à-dire
lorsque celui-ci atteignait 50 mm ou plus.
Les mêmes calculs effectués uniquement à partir des
données des patients adultes (≥18 ans) ont donné des résultats
similaires ; le risque annuel de dissection aortique ou de décès
a été de 0,10 % (IC à 95 % : 0,00 à 0,29) lorsque le diamètre
aortique n’excédait pas 39 mm, de 0,12 % (IC à 95 % :
0,00 à 0,34) lorsqu’il était compris entre 40 et 44 mm,
de 0,31 % (IC à 95 % : 0,00 à 0,74) lorsqu’il était compris
entre 45 et 49 mm, de 1,37 % (IC à 95 % : 0,00 à 4,07) lorsqu’il
était compris entre 50 et 54 mm et de 8,14 % (IC à 95 % :
0,00 à 24,09) lorsqu’il était égal ou supérieur à 55 mm.
Discussion
La principale observation de notre étude est le faible
taux d’événements aortiques enregistré au sein d’une
population dans laquelle le diagnostic de syndrome de
Marfan a été porté sur la base des critères internationaux
(classification nosologique de Gand),9 dès lors que sont
appliquées les recommandations en vigueur, fondées sur
l’instauration systématique d’un traitement bêtabloquant,
sur la formulation de mises en garde concernant la pratique
sportive et les activités physiques, sur des mesures régulières
10:00:26:07:12
Page 312
du diamètre aortique par échocardiographie et sur le traitement chirurgical préventif de la racine aortique lorsque le
diamètre aortique absolu atteint 50 mm.15 En appliquant ces
règles, nous n’avons enregistré que 7 événements aortiques
pour 732 patients sur une période de suivi de 6,6 ± 4,3 ans, ce
qui établit le risque annuel à 0,17 %. Ce risque peut être
stratifié en fonction du diamètre aortique, comme le montre la
Figure 2. Lorsque seuls ont été pris en considération les
patients dont le diamètre aortique était inférieur à 50 mm, en
excluant un cas de syndrome de Marfan néonatal, une femme
enceinte dont le diamètre aortique était de 45 mm et une
femme de 72 ans qui avaient précédemment été opérée deux
fois et avait présenté un infarctus aigu du myocarde, le risque
annuel a chuté en dessous de 0,05 %. Prévenir la dissection
aortique est essentiel, car il est clairement établi que la
survenue d’un tel événement diminue l’espérance de vie du
patient, surtout si l’aorte demeure disséquée après chirurgie,16
ces risques à court et long termes devant être comparés au
risque associé au traitement chirurgical préventif, qui est
faible dans les centres rompus à ces interventions.
Rares sont les données disponibles sur le risque aortique
effectif encouru par les patients qui présentent un anévrisme
de l’aorte ascendante imputable à un syndrome de Marfan.
Au vu des données de la Duke University, le taux d’événements a été jugé faible chez les patients porteurs d’un
anévrisme de l’aorte thoracique lorsque leur diamètre
aortique maximal est inférieur à 60 mm.6,14 Selon le registre
international des dissections aortiques aiguës, qui, comme son
nom l’indique, ne concerne que les patients ayant présenté un
tel événement, des dissections aortiques ont été observées
alors que le diamètre de l’artère était inférieur à 50 mm, ce qui
montre que le risque n’est pas absent pour autant.8 Il est
toutefois difficile de formuler d’autres conclusions à partir de
Page 313
Jondeau et al
Incidence des événements aortiques chez les patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan
cette base de données dans la mesure où l’on ignore combien
de patients dont le diamètre aortique était comparable mais
qui n’ont pas présenté de dissection ont survécu. L’estimation
de leur nombre est malaisée, car, dans la plupart des cas,
l’affection peut demeurer méconnue, ce qui prive également
ces patients du bénéfice d’un traitement préventif et augmente
par là-même, le risque de dissection aortique ou de décès
auquel ils sont exposés. Chez la plupart des individus atteints
d’un syndrome de Marfan, il est possible de déceler
précocement l’affection du fait de son caractère génétique qui
autorise un dépistage familial. Il est donc théoriquement plus
facile d’évaluer le risque effectif d’événements aortiques
dans cette population que chez les patients présentant un
anévrisme aortique lié à une autre cause. Cela étant, en raison
de la rareté de la maladie et de l’absence de grandes séries,
les recommandations ont été formulées à partir des
données recueillies dans des cohortes de patients porteurs
d’anévrismes aortiques de causes inconnues et sur la base
d’avis d’experts, ce qui est à l’origine de certaines
discordances.3–5 Nous espérons que les données de notre
présente série permettront de clore le débat.
Chez les patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan, les
facteurs identifiés comme contribuant à augmenter le risque
de dissection aortique sont l’augmentation du diamètre
aortique,17 l’extension de la dilatation au-delà du sinus de
Valsalva,18 les antécédents familiaux de dissection aortique
précoce,19 l’hypertension artérielle, l’absence de traitement
bêtabloquant,20 la pratique de sports violents tels que le
culturisme,21,22 le syndrome d’apnées du sommeil23 et l’augmentation rapide du diamètre de l’aorte. Nous confirmons
que le risque d’événement aortique est influencé par le
diamètre aortique (Figure 1), mais nous n’avons pu évaluer,
dans cette étude, l’impact des autres facteurs pour deux
raisons. Comme nous avons appliqué à notre population
les enseignements procurés par les études antérieures, notre
travail ne permet pas de jauger l’importance des facteurs de
risque précédemment identifiés ; en effet, l’hypertension
artérielle a été traitée lorsqu’elle était présente, les patients ont
été dissuadés de se livrer à des activités sportives énergiques et
une chirurgie aortique leur a été proposée avant que leur
diamètre aortique n’atteigne le seuil habituel s’il était en augmentation rapide (sous réserve de confirmation par une
seconde technique d’imagerie) ou s’il existait des antécédents
de dissections survenues chez des membres de la famille dont
le diamètre aortique était inférieur à 50 mm. De ce fait, le faible
taux d’événements nous a privés de la puissance nécessaire
pour effectuer une analyse multivariée. Nos résultats valident,
par ailleurs, le protocole de traitement médical proposé chez
les patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan. Nos données
mettent, de plus, en lumière l’intérêt d’une mesure précise du
diamètre aortique chez ces patients, car une différence de
quelques millimètres a son importance, notamment pour
poser l’indication d’un traitement chirurgical.
Dans cette étude, nous n’avons inclus que les patients qui
avaient commencé à être pris en charge dans notre centre
avant qu’ils aient présenté un événement aortique ou fait
l’objet d’une intervention chirurgicale aortique ; cela signifie
que les taux d’événements dont nous faisons état sont ceux
observés dans une population de patients atteints d’un
syndrome de Marfan avéré, traités par bêtabloquant (ou
10:00:26:07:12
Page 313
313
inhibiteur calcique en cas d’intolérance aux bêtabloquants),
qui évitaient généralement tout effort violent et bénéficiaient
d’un suivi régulier. Les résultats rapportés peuvent donc
s’écarter de l’histoire naturelle spontanée du syndrome de
Marfan chez les patients qui ne font pas l’objet de ce type de
protocole de soins. Pour autant, en pratique, nos données
reflètent l’impact clinique des actuelles modalités de prise en
charge préconisées dans cette population.
L’efficacité de cette prise en charge moderne des patients
atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan souligne l’importance d’un
diagnostic précoce, s’appuyant sur un dépistage familial
systématique et, le cas échéant et si cela est possible, sur la
biologie moléculaire, afin de donner à une plus vaste
population de patients la chance de bénéficier de ce type de
protocole. Nos données suggèrent également que, dans les
études visant à évaluer des stratégies ou des thérapeutiques
nouvellement développées, le critère de jugement devrait être
la capacité à retarder la dilatation aortique et, donc, le traitement chirurgical, car la mortalité n’est probablement pas un
critère de jugement pertinent dans cette population.24–27
Limites de l’étude
Ce travail était une étude observationnelle menée sur une
cohorte historique. Néanmoins, les données ont été saisies
selon une approche prospective ; en outre, l’organisation
centralisée de la prise en charge des maladies rares en France,
qui vise à promouvoir les études épidémiologiques, et la
collaboration étroite avec l’Association Française du
Syndrome de Marfan et Apparentés (AFSMA) favorisent la
notification systématique à notre centre des événements
survenus chez ces patients, même lorsqu’ils ne sont pas
régulièrement suivis dans nos murs. Par ailleurs, seulement
un patient dont le diamètre aortique était compris entre 45 et
50 mm a été perdu de vue.
Conclusions
Les résultats de cette étude montrent qu’une prise en charge
moderne et un traitement chirurgical programmé sont à même
de prévenir la dissection aortique chez la quasi-totalité des
patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan, sous réserve qu’ils
soient traités par bêtabloquant, proscrivent les activités
sportives intenses et bénéficient d’un suivi échocardiographique annuel. Chez ces patients, le risque de mort subite
ou de dissection demeure faible (de l’ordre de 0,3 % par an)
dès lors que leur diamètre aortique est compris entre 45 et
49 mm. Le risque encouru est encore plus bas (inférieur à
0,05 % par an) chez les patients dont le syndrome de Marfan
est pris en charge selon les modalités actuelles. C’est
pourquoi, en l’absence de facteur de risque particulier (tel
qu’un antécédent familial de dissection dans un contexte de
dilatation minime), un diamètre aortique de 50 mm semble être
un seuil raisonnable pour poser l’indication d’un traitement
chirurgical préventif ; cela montre, en outre, l’importance
d’un diagnostic précoce fondé sur le dépistage familial.
Remerciements
Sophie Rushton-Smith, PhD, nous a apporté son aide dans
l’élaboration de la version finale de ce manuscrit, son intervention
s’étant limitée à la mise en forme linguistique, à la vérification du
contenu et à la mise en page et ayant été rétribuée par les auteurs.
Page 314
314
Circulation
Septembre 2012
Nous souhaitons également remercier Maria Tchitchinadze pour son
aide dans l’exploitation de la base de données.
Sources de financement
L’étude a été financée par le ministère français de la Santé (PHRC
AOM09093) et par l’Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR 2010
BLAN 1129).
11.
12.
Déclarations
Néant.
Références
1. Judge DP, Dietz HC. Marfan’s syndrome. Lancet. 2005;366:1965–1976.
2. Pyeritz RE. Marfan syndrome: 30 years of research equals 30 years of
additional life expectancy. Heart. 2009;95:173–175.
3. Vahanian A, Baumgartner H, Bax J, Butchart E, Dion R, Filippatos G,
Flachskampf F, Hall R, Iung B, Kasprzak J, Nataf P, Tornos P, Torracca L,
Wenink A. Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease: the
Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease of the European
Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J. 2007;28:230–268.
4. Hiratzka LF, Bakris GL, Beckman JA, Bersin RM, Carr VF, Casey DE Jr,
Eagle KA, Hermann LK, Isselbacher EM, Kazerooni EA, Kouchoukos
NT, Lytle BW, Milewicz DM, Reich DL, Sen S, Shinn JA, Svensson LG,
Williams DM. 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/
SVM guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with
thoracic aortic disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology
Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American College of
Radiology, American Stroke Association, Society of Cardiovascular
Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons,
and Society for Vascular Medicine. Circulation. 2010;121:e266–e369.
5. Baumgartner H, Bonhoeffer P, De Groot NM, de Haan F, Deanfield JE,
Galie N, Gatzoulis MA, Gohlke-Baerwolf C, Kaemmerer H, Kilner P,
Meijboom F, Mulder BJ, Oechslin E, Oliver JM, Serraf A, Szatmari A,
Thaulow E, Vouhe PR, Walma E, Vahanian A, Auricchio A, Bax J, Ceconi
C, Dean V, Filippatos G, Funck-Brentano C, Hobbs R, Kearney P,
McDonagh T, Popescu BA, Reiner Z, Sechtem U, Sirnes PA, Tendera M,
Vardas P, Widimsky P, Swan L, Andreotti F, Beghetti M, Borggrefe M,
Bozio A, Brecker S, Budts W, Hess J, Hirsch R, Jondeau G, Kokkonen J,
Kozelj M, Kucukoglu S, Laan M, Lionis C, Metreveli I, Moons P, Pieper
PG, Pilossoff V, Popelova J, Price S, Roos-Hesselink J, Uva MS, Tornos P,
Trindade PT, Ukkonen H, Walker H, Webb GD, Westby Jack; Task Force
on the Management of Grown-up Congenital Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ESC guidelines for the management of
grown-up congenital heart disease (new version 2010): the Task Force on
the Management of Grown-up Congenital Heart Disease of the European
Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J. 2010;31:2915–2957.
6. Davies RR, Goldstein LJ, Coady MA, Tittle SL, Rizzo JA, Kopf GS,
Elefteriades JA. Yearly rupture or dissection rates for thoracic aortic
aneurysms: simple prediction based on size. Ann Thorac Surg. 2002;73:7–27.
7. Pearson GD, Devereux R, Loeys B, Maslen C, Milewicz D, Pyeritz R,
Ramirez F, Rifkin D, Sakai L, Svensson L, Wessels A, Van Eyk J, Dietz HC.
Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National
Marfan Foundation Working Group on research in Marfan syndrome and
related disorders. Circulation. 2008;118:785–791.
8. Pape LA, Tsai TT, Isselbacher EM, Oh JK, O’Gara PT, Evangelista A,
Fattori R, Meinhardt G, Trimarchi S, Bossone E, Suzuki T, Cooper JV,
Froehlich JB, Nienaber CA, Eagle KA. Aortic diameter _5.5 cm is not a
good predictor of type A aortic dissection: observations from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD). Circulation. 2007;
116:1120–1127.
9. De Paepe A, Devereux RB, Dietz HC, Hennekam RC, Pyeritz RE. Revised
diagnostic criteria for the Marfan syndrome. Am J Med Genet. 1996;62:
417–426.
10. Jondeau G, Barthelet M, Baumann C, Bonnet D, Chevallier B, Collignon P,
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Dulac Y, Edouard T, Faivre L, Germain D, Khau Van Kien P, Lacombe D,
Ladouceur M, Lemerrer M, Leheup B, Lupoglazoff JM, Magnier S, Muti
C, Plauchu PH, Raffestin B, Sassolas F, Schleich JM, Sidi D, Themar-Noel
C, Varin J, Wolf JE. Recommendations for the medical management of
aortic complications of Marfan’s syndrome [in French]. Arch Mal Coeur
Vaiss. 2006;99:540–546.
Mitchell JH, Haskell W, Snell P, Van Camp SP. Task Force 8: classification
of sports. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;45:1364–1367.
Lang RM, Bierig M, Devereux RB, Flachskampf FA, Foster E, Pellikka
PA, Picard MH, Roman MJ, Seward J, Shanewise JS, Solomon SD, Spencer
KT, Sutton MS, Stewart WJ. Recommendations for chamber quantification: a report from the American Society of Echocardiography’s Guidelines
and Standards Committee and the Chamber Quantification Writing Group,
developed in conjunction with the European Association of Echocardiography, a branch of the European Society of Cardiology. J Am Soc
Echocardiogr. 2005;18:1440–1463.
Roman MJ, Devereux RB, Kramer-Fox R, O’Loughlin J. Twodimensional
echocardiographic aortic root dimensions in normal children and adults.
Am J Cardiol. 1989;64:507–512.
Davies RR, Gallo A, Coady MA, Tellides G, Botta DM, Burke B, Coe MP,
Kopf GS, Elefteriades JA. Novel measurement of relative aortic size predicts
rupture of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;81:169–177.
Keane MG, Pyeritz RE. Medical management of Marfan syndrome.
Circulation. 2008;117:2802–2813.
Mimoun L, Detaint D, Hamroun D, Arnoult F, Delorme G, Gautier M,
Milleron O, Meuleman C, Raoux F, Boileau C, Vahanian A, Jondeau G.
Dissection in Marfan syndrome: the importance of the descending aorta.
Eur Heart J. 2011;32:443–449.
Gott VL, Greene PS, Alejo DE, Cameron DE, Naftel DC, Miller DC,
Gillinov AM, Laschinger JC, Pyeritz RE. Replacement of the aortic root in
patients with Marfan’s syndrome. N Engl J Med. 1999;340:1307–1313.
Roman MJ, Rosen SE, Kramer-Fox R, Devereux RB. Prognostic
significance of the pattern of aortic root dilation in the Marfan syndrome.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993;22:1470–1476.
Silverman DI, Gray J, Roman MJ, Bridges A, Burton K, Boxer M,
Devereux RB, Tsipouras P. Family history of severe cardiovascular disease
in Marfan syndrome is associated with increased aortic diameter and
decreased survival. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1995;26:1062–1067.
Shores J, Berger KR, Murphy EA, Pyeritz RE. Progression of aortic
dilatation and the benefit of long-term beta-adrenergic blockade in
Marfan’s syndrome. N Engl J Med. 1994;330:1335–1341.
Baumgartner FJ, Omari BO, Robertson JM. Weight lifting, Marfan’s syndrome, and acute aortic dissection. Ann Thorac Surg. 1997;64:1871–1872.
Turk UO, Alioglu E, Nalbantgil S, Nart D. Catastrophic cardiovascular
consequences of weight lifting in a family with Marfan syndrome. Turk
Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2008;36:32–34.
Kohler M, Blair E, Risby P, Nickol AH, Wordsworth P, Forfar C, Stradling
JR. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea and its association with
aortic dilatation in Marfan’s syndrome. Thorax. 2009; 64:162–166.
Detaint D, Aegerter P, Tubach F, Hoffman I, Plauchu H, Dulac Y, Faivre
LO, Delrue MA, Collignon P, Odent S, Tchitchinadze M, Bouffard C,
Arnoult F, Gautier M, Boileau C, Jondeau G. Rationale and design of a
randomized clinical trial (Marfan Sartan) of angiotensin II receptor
blocker therapy versus placebo in individuals with Marfan syndrome. Arch
Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;103:317–325.
Gambarin FI, Favalli V, Serio A, Regazzi M, Pasotti M, Klersy C, Dore R,
Mannarino S, Vigano M, Odero A, Amato S, Tavazzi L, Arbustini E.
Rationale and design of a trial evaluating the effects of losartan vs.
nebivolol vs. the association of both on the progression of aortic root
dilation in Marfan syndrome with FBN1 gene mutations. J Cardiovasc Med
(Hagerstown). 2009;10:354–362.
Lacro RV, Dietz HC, Wruck LM, Bradley TJ, Colan SD, Devereux RB,
Klein GL, Li JS, Minich LL, Paridon SM, Pearson GD, Printz BF, Pyeritz
RE, Radojewski E, Roman MJ, Saul JP, Stylianou MP, Mahony L.
Rationale and design of a randomized clinical trial of beta-blocker therapy
(atenolol) versus angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy (losartan) in
individuals with Marfan syndrome. Am Heart J. 2007;154:624–631.
Radonic T, de Witte P, Baars MJ, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Groenink
M. Losartan therapy in adults with Marfan syndrome: study protocol of
the multi-center randomized controlled COMPARE trial. Trials. 2010;11:3.
PERSPECTIVE CLINIQUE
Le syndrome de Marfan est une maladie génétique généralement imputable à une mutation du gène codant pour la fibrilline 1 (FBN1) et qui se transmet sur
le mode autosomique dominant. L’origine génétique de l’affection autorise un diagnostic précoce par dépistage familial. La dilatation progressive de l’aorte
conduisant à sa dissection ou à sa rupture est la principale complication potentiellement fatale associée à ce syndrome. La prise en charge médicale
comprend la prescription d’un traitement bêtabloquant et l’interdiction des activités sportives intenses. Un suivi régulier des patients est indispensable afin
de mesurer le diamètre échocardiographique de l’aorte et d’évaluer la nécessité d’un traitement chirurgical à visée préventive. Dans la présente étude, 732
patients ont été pris en charge selon ces principes et un diamètre aortique de 50 mm a été retenu comme seuil d’intervention chirurgicale. En appliquant cette
stratégie, nous avons montré que, chez les patients dont le diamètre aortique était inférieur à 50 mm, le risque annuel d’événement aortique (dissection,
rupture ou mort subite) avait été inférieur à 0,05 % en l’absence de facteurs de risque connus tels que la grossesse, les antécédents familiaux de dissection
d’une aorte de faible diamètre ou l’augmentation rapide du diamètre du vaisseau. Le risque augmente avec le diamètre de l’aorte mesuré au niveau du sinus
de Valsalva ; il est apparu quatre fois plus élevé chez les patients dont le diamètre aortique était compris entre 50 et 54 mm que chez ceux qui présentaient un
diamètre compris entre 45 et 49 mm. Un diamètre de 50 mm au niveau du sinus de Valsalva semble donc être un seuil raisonnable pour proposer une
intervention chirurgicale préventive aux patients atteints d’un syndrome de Marfan.
10:00:26:07:12
Page 314
Auteur
Документ
Catégorie
Без категории
Affichages
96
Taille du fichier
724 Кб
Étiquettes
1/--Pages
signaler